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Mary Warren is the hinge-pin  in the play. She knows all about the deceptions and intrigues that have been foisted upon the community of Salem by Abigail. She is a servant in the Proctor's home and is treated accordingly and punished for insubordination and refusal to obey instructions in ways that seem incomprehensible to us nowadays.

Mary turns on John Proctor when she realizes that she can have power over him if she accuses him of witchery. She teams up with Abigail and discovers a new-found power. She is believed, and she receives attention that she is not used to having.

Toward the end of the play, when it appears that John Proctor or Elizabeth Proctor will be accused of witchcraft, John implores Mary Warren to tell the truth about the entire incident. When Mary accuses Abigail of the lie, Abigail then accuses Mary of bewitching her. She ends up fearing for her life and joins with Abigail in accusing John Proctor of witchcraft.

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Mary Warren is the Proctors' maid or servant.  When she comes back from court in Act II scene 2, explaining where she was and why, John is extremely angry with her for leaving without his permission.  He is violent towards her, and once she tells him that she must go again to court the next day, he whips her.  She is treated very much like the servant she is, and because of her defiant behavior, she is treated like a little child who doesn't obey her strict parents and deserves a "spanking."

Once she is cornered in court at the end of that same scene, Mary turns the tables on Proctor.  She makes him out to be a devil's follower and she unites with Abigail, knowing that she holds the power over the court and the people in it. Mary screams at Proctor, "No, I love God; I go your way no more!" And with that, she has gained a power she has not yet held.  She is treated as an adult and they begin to believe all she says.  She realized that her only way to make others listen to her was to join Abigail.  So Mary was a dynamic character who went from a whimpering little girl to a powerful ally to Abigail, and was treated accordingly.

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How was Elizabeth treated in The Crucible?

It is understood that Elizabeth suffers a fairly raw deal in the drama.  She has to see her husband, her child's father, punished for telling the truth, and her desire to protect help in lying for him actually does him more harm than good.  She has to also endure that the initial force of the accusations against her are motivated not by an innocent, doe eyed girl, but a vengeful young woman who covets her husband.  All of this would indicate harsh treatment.  However, Elizabeth undergoes a transformation that allows her to embrace the values of loyalty and companionship that transcends these contingencies.  While she pleads with John to sign the confession, Elizabeth is also made aware that there are critical moments that serve to define one's state of being in the world.  These moments cannot be dismissed, for in doing, one dismisses their chance to be better than they could have ever hoped to be.  When she understands her husband's decision and supports him to his very death, it is a moment where Elizabeth transcends the temporary and moves into a realm of permanence where real values are endorsed in a setting that embraces inauthenticity.  It is here where Elizabeth's treatment allows her to become something more than anyone else in the play could hope to be.

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How was Rebeca Nurse treated in The Crucible?

In his poem, "The Second Coming," William Butler Yeats uses one line to truly evoke the idea of a world that has lost all control, spiraling into chaos.  He writes, "The best lack all conviction, while the worst are filled with passionate intensity."  The idea that comes from this is an idea to show social fragmentation is a reality in any setting where the good and righteous are not respected and the malevolent forces enjoy the power.  This is an apt description of how Goody Rebecca Nurse is treated. When someone is accused of witchcraft after 26 grandchildren and 11 children, something is amiss.  A figure in the town that represents nurturing, care, and utter devotion, Rebecca Nurse is subjected to the wild accusations of Abigail as well as those in the position of power who seek to consolidate their control.  A reflection of the goodness of people that becomes trampled when the worst obtain power, she is treated in a manner that makes her almost a martyr.  Certainly, her treatment becomes a catalyst for Proctor to resist the confession and stand for truth at a horrific cost.

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