Critical Overview

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Last Updated on May 6, 2015, by eNotes Editorial. Word Count: 260

‘‘Crazy Sunday’’ was included in the last collection of Fitzgerald’s short stories published in his lifetime, Taps at Reveille . Unfortunately, by the time the book was published in 1935, few reviewers were interested in Fitzgerald’s work. Those who were interested noticed the changes taking place in Fitzgerald’s maturing fiction....

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‘‘Crazy Sunday’’ was included in the last collection of Fitzgerald’s short stories published in his lifetime, Taps at Reveille. Unfortunately, by the time the book was published in 1935, few reviewers were interested in Fitzgerald’s work. Those who were interested noticed the changes taking place in Fitzgerald’s maturing fiction. In F. Scott Fitzgerald: The Man and His Work, Alfred Kazin quotes a New Republic review by T. S. Mathews: ‘‘The yearning toward maturity is even more noticeable in some of these short stories than it is in his novels.’’ Mathews adds that many of the characters grapple with the fact that life requires them to mature and behave like adults. Although ‘‘Crazy Sunday’’ is well liked among Fitzgerald’s readers, there is little critical commentary about it beyond grouping it with Fitzgerald’s better-known Hollywood stories, such as the Pat Hobby series of short stories and his unfinished novel, The Last Tycoon.

Much commentary on Fitzgerald’s short fiction in general sheds critical light on ‘‘Crazy Sunday.’’ In Student Companion to F. Scott Fitzgerald, for example, author Linda Pelzer observes that Fitzgerald’s best short stories share connections with his novels. She writes, ‘‘All of his best stories are connected thematically to his novels. In fact, several seem to anticipate or repeat not only thematic concerns, but also plot elements and figurative motifs that are integral to the novels.’’ ‘‘Crazy Sunday’’ is set in Hollywood, and a main character (Miles) is said to be based on Irving Thalberg. Both of these elements are repeated in The Last Tycoon.

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Criticism