Composed upon Westminster Bridge, September 3, 1802 by William Wordsworth

Start Your Free Trial

Download Composed upon Westminster Bridge, September 3, 1802 Study Guide

Subscribe Now

The Poem

(Critical Guide to Poetry for Students)

This poem’s title, “Composed upon Westminster Bridge, September 3, 1802,” tells the reader its setting: William Wordsworth is in London on the bridge that crosses the Thames River by the houses of Parliament, close to where Big Ben’s Tower stands today. When he tells the poem’s place and date of composition, however, the poet may not be strictly accurate. He probably began composing the poem on July 31 as he crossed the bridge at the beginning of a journey to France; he may have then finished it by his return on September 3. His sister, Dorothy Wordsworth, records that on July 31 as they drove over Westminster Bridge they saw St. Paul’s Cathedral in the distance and noticed that the Thames was filled with many small boats. “The houses were not overhung,” she reports, “by their cloud of smoke, and they were spread out endlessly, yet the sun shone so brightly, with such a pure light” that it seemed like “one of nature’s own grand spectacles.” Dorothy Wordsworth’s description can help one to read the poem.

The reader may first think that the poet is musing to himself, but his somewhat public tone suggests a general audience. One may first be puzzled; if it were not for its title, the general subject of the poem would not be immediately apparent. Lines 1 through 3 make a forceful assertion, but it is a negative one: Whatever the “sight” turns out to be, nothing on earth is more beautiful, and only a very insensitive person could ignore it. All one knows of this “sight” so far is that it is impressive (“majestic”) and moving (“touching”).

In line 4, the reader discovers that the subject of the poem is the beauty of the city. One should probably take “City” to mean all the parts of greater London that could have been seen from Westminster Bridge in 1802, and perhaps in particular the sections called the City of Westminster (located by the bridge) and the City of London, with its towers and spires visible downriver on the north bank of the Thames. The poet, echoing his sister’s description, describes the panorama of this vast city in the silence and clear air of an early morning in summer. He sees the tops of many different structures; he sees ships on the river, but most of all such urban landmarks as theaters and churches. The dome must be that of St. Paul’s itself. His eyes move easily from these buildings to the sky and to the open hills and fields that in those days lay close to central London to the southwest and were visible on hills to the north.

At line 9, the poet stops his description of London and begins to compare it to those wonderful sights he has seen in nature. He has never seen anything in nature more beautiful than this view of the city. He has never seen a sight any more calm than this, nor presumably has any sight ever caused him to feel more calm himself. In the poem’s final three lines, the poet returns to give vivid, even...

(The entire section is 1,005 words.)