Characters

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Last Reviewed on June 19, 2019, by eNotes Editorial. Word Count: 289

Miss Pat is the stewardess on the slave ship that's departing the Gold Coast at the beginning of the play. She wears a hot pink uniform and instructs people on how to put on their shackles. At the end of the play, she warns people to take their baggage because any baggage that isn't claimed gets trashed.

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Aunt Ethel is the host of the cooking show in the second sketch. She's described as a "down-home black woman with a bandana on her head." She explains how to make "a batch of negroes" and discusses social concerns and things like humility, attitude, and humor.

Junie Robinson is a soldier who is charming but not very bright. He says that God or the Devil warns him that other black soldiers won't have happiness after the war; he sneaks around and kills them to save them from that future pain.

Miss Roj is a man dressed in patio pants, go-go boots, a halter top, and cat-shaped sunglasses. He discusses style and power and says that he was able to give someone a heart attack just by lifting his hand and snapping.

Lala Lamazing Grace is a cocky star who speaks with a French accent. Her image is projected onto museum walls as she enters. She says she's the ninth wonder of the modern world.

Admonia is Lala's maid.

Flo'rance is Lala's lover.

Norma Jean Reynolds is a young country girl. She has sex with the garbage man and lays an egg.

Topsy Washington is stylish and energetic. She loves to dance and party. She says that when God created the world, he didn't rest on the seventh day; he partied. She says she's dancing to the madness of the music in her.

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