Christ's Victorie & Triumph In Heaven And Earth, Over And After Death "In A Fool's Paradise"
by Giles Fletcher

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"In A Fool's Paradise"

(Magill's Quotations in Context)

Context: The admixture of Old and New Testament scriptures is in this poem the basis for an allegorical account of the messianic purpose. When Christ went into the wilderness, as reported by Mark and modified by Fletcher, the beasts surrounded without harming Him. This episode is sometimes interpreted in art as "The Peacable Kingdom," when the lion will lie down with the lamb, but here Diana enters, then Syre (satyr or the devil) who tempts Jesus before wriggling away. Presumption with a painted face enters and tries to tempt Christ. She asks Him if He is the Son of God as she offers him the pleasure of the world. (Other instances of this expression are in Milton, Pope, and George Du Maurier.)

Poore foole, she thought herselfe in wondrous price
With God, as if in Paradise she wear,
But, wear shee not in a fooles paradise,
She might have seene more reason to despere:
But him she, like some ghastly fiend did feare . . .