Christopher Pearse Cranch Further Reading - Essay

Further Reading

(Nineteenth-Century Literary Criticism)

BIOGRAPHY

Kane, Paul. “Christopher Pearse Cranch.” In Poetry of the American Renaissance: A Diverse Anthology from the Romantic Period, p. 165. New York: George Braziller, 1995.

Brief biographical sketch of Cranch accompanying a selection of his poetry.

CRITICISM

Dedmond, Francis B. “‘A Pencil in the Grasp of Your Graphic Wit’: An Illustrated Letter from C. P. Cranch to Theodore Parker.” Studies in the American Renaissance (1981): 345-57.

Includes the text of an 1848 letter, complete with several caricatures, from Cranch in Rome to his friend Theodore Parker.

Dedmond, Francis B. “Christopher Pearse Cranch's ‘Journal. 1839.’” Studies in the American Renaissance (1983): 129-49.

Reprints Cranch's 1839 journal written when he was substituting for James Freeman Clarke in his Louisville pulpit and as editor of the Western Messenger.

Delano, Sterling F. “Christopher Pearse Cranch's Address Delivered Before the Harvard Musical Association (28 August 1845).” Resources for American Literary Study 17, no. 2 (1991): 239-53.

Provides the full text of Cranch's address, suggesting that critical attention to the significance of music in the Transcendentalist movement is long overdue.

Habich, Robert D. “1837-1839: ‘A Living Mirror of the Times.’” In Transcendentalism and the “Western Messenger”: A History of the Magazine and Its Contributors, 1835-1841, pp. 82-126. Rutherford: Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 1985.

Outlines Cranch's importance to the magazine and credits him as the most talented of the Transcendentalists after Emerson and Thoreau.

Koster, Donald N. “Some Other Important Transcendentalists.” In Transcendentalism in America, pp. 64-76. Boston: Twayne, 1975.

Praises Cranch's sense of humor but labels him a dilettante.

Miller, Perry. “Christopher Pearse Cranch (1813-1892).” In The Transcendentalists: An Anthology, pp. 178-80. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1950.

Discusses Cranch's review of Emerson's The American Scholar, calling Cranch a “futile and wasted talent.”

Myerson, Joel. “Transcendentalism and Unitarianism in 1840: A New Letter by C. P. Cranch.” CLA Journal 16, no. 3 (March 1973): 366-68.

Reprints the full text of a letter from Cranch to John Sullivan Dwight with inferences to the controversy involving Unitarianism and Transcendentalism.

Additional coverage of Cranch's life and career is contained in the following sources published by the Gale Group: Dictionary of Literary Biography, Vols. 1 and 42.