The Chicago Renaissance Criticism: The Language Debate - Essay

Craig Werner (essay date 1990)

(Twentieth-Century Literary Criticism)

SOURCE: Werner, Craig. “Leon Forrest and the AACM: The Jazz Impulse and the Legacy of the Chicago Renaissance.” In Leon Forrest: Introductions and Interpretations, edited by John G. Cawelti, pp. 127-51. Bowling Green, Ohio.: Bowling Green State University Press, 1990.

[In the following essay, Werner argues that the art and experience of Leon Forrest and other contemporary musicians and artists who have attempted to merge African-American tradition with European trends are part and parcel of the Chicago Renaissance. Werner also states that these connections are a significant contribution to the development of African-American culture in the United States, and deserving of more...

(The entire section is 9180 words.)

Lisa Woolley (essay date 2000)

(Twentieth-Century Literary Criticism)

SOURCE: Woolley, Lisa. “Dialect is a Virus: Chicago's Literary Vernacular Amid Linguistic Purity Movements.” In American Voices of the Chicago Renaissance, pp. 16-38. Dekalb: Northern Illinois University Press, 2000.

[In the following essay, Woolley discusses the issues surrounding the use of dialect and immigrant speech in the writings of the authors of the Chicago Renaissance, noting that although these practices seem somewhat racist due to the stereotypes they represent, the use of linguistic dialect in the writing of the time was in fact a response to prejudice in language and expression.]

[T]h' best way to masther th' language iv anny...

(The entire section is 10350 words.)

Lisa Woolley (essay date 2000)

(Twentieth-Century Literary Criticism)

SOURCE: Woolley, Lisa. “‘The Best Conversation the World Has to Offer’: Chicago’s Women Poets and Editors.” In American Voices of the Chicago Renaissance, pp. 91-119. Dekalb.: Northern Illinois University Press, 2000.

[In the following essay, Woolley surveys the work of such women poets as Eunice Tietjens, Alice Corbin, Mary Aldis, and Marjorie Allen Seiffert in the context of the Chicago Renaissance, noting that these writers challenged and confirmed various stereotypes regarding women's language and writing choices.]

If anyone has a delicate and quick way of living it is always not so important to people as if he had a strong and heavy...

(The entire section is 11677 words.)