illustration of Fortunato standing in motley behind a mostly completed brick wall with a skull superimposed on the wall where his face should be

The Cask of Amontillado

by Edgar Allan Poe

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Montresor leads Fortunato into the catacombs in "The Cask of Amontillado."

Summary:

In "The Cask of Amontillado," Montresor leads Fortunato into the catacombs as part of a plan to exact revenge. He uses Fortunato's pride in his wine connoisseurship to lure him with the promise of sampling a rare vintage, ultimately leading him to his demise.

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In "The Cask of Amontillado," where does Montresor take Fortunato for revenge?

Montresor has a long-standing problem with Fortunato.  We do not know what it is, because we are never told.  Montresor knows that Fortunato is a wine connoisseur, and tempts him with an Amontillado - a type of sherry wine.  Montresor wants Fortunato to taste the wine to see if it's the real thing.  Montresor lures Fortunato into Montresor's family's catacombs in search of the wine.  The catacombs are deep underground.  Once there, Montresor shackles Fortunato to the wall and proceeds to brick Fortunato into that recessed area.

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In "The Cask of Amontillado," where does Montresor take Fortunato for revenge?

The story is set in a city that has catacombs underneath it, which are narrow passageways that contain old tombs, and where people store their wine to keep it cold and safe.  It is most likely in Europe, probably in Italy.  These catacombs are dark, dank, damp, and very maze-like, and super easy to get lost in if you don't know where you are going.  They are also rarely visited; the occasional person goes down to get some wine, if they have some under their apartment or house, but otherwise, pretty abandoned.  They are made of stone, and often in a state of crumbling decay.

It is into these maze-like tunnels that Montresor leads Fortunado.  Fortunado is not alarmed by this, because the pretense that Montresor uses is that he has a wine that he wants Fortunado to taste; wine is kept in the tunnels, so he follows him there willingly.  They go through Montresor's house, and descend some stairs, and

"We came at length to the foot of the descent, and stood together upon the damp ground of the catacombs of the Montresors."

Montresor obviously came from a long-standing family that had owned that house and those catacombs for a while, because Montresor says they belong to his family, and mentions later that they were "a great and numerous family" when Fortunado mentions that his tombs are "extensive."  Montresor leads him further and further until he reaches his goal:

"At the most remote end of the crypt there appeared another less spacious... From the fourth side the bones had been thrown down...we perceived a still interior crypt or recess, in depth about four feet, in width three, in height six or seven."

He chains Fortunado in the chamber, and walls it up, leaving him to his fate.  I hope that these thoughts help to to picture the environment that the unfortunate Fortunado finds himself in; good luck!

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In "The Cask of Amontillado," where does Montresor take Fortunato for revenge?

As Montresor says, he never lets on to Fortunato that he feels injured by him or is seeking revenge. Instead, he smiles at him, and undoubtedly studies his psychology.

Montresor knows Fortunato's weak points. For example, he knows that Fortunato is vain about his knowledge of wines. That is why he uses the amontillado as bait. Montresor can rest assured that once his plans are laid, Fortunato won't turn down the chance to sample a fine wine any more than a mouse will refuse the cheese in a trap.

Further, he knows that Fortunato is not the type of person to suspect people are out to hurt him, and especially does not suspect this of Montresor. Partially, that is because Montresor has done his best to assure Fortunato he is his friend, but also, we have at least one hint that Fortunato thinks he is superior to Montresor. When Montresor says he is a mason, and Fortunato mistakes that for a freemason, the secret society to which he belongs, Fortunato says, in a somewhat arrogant way, that it is impossible Montresor could be a member:

“You? Impossible! A mason?”

This suggests that Fortunato doesn't think Montresor is worthy of joining. If Fortunato does think Montresor is inferior, he won't imagine he could outwit him.

Finally, Montresor makes sure Fortunato stays drunk, which means he is not aware of what has happened until it is too late.

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In "The Cask of Amontillado," where does Montresor take Fortunato for revenge?

Montressor used Fortunado's ego to trick him into the cellar. Fortunato believed that he knew everything about wines. Montressor told him he had a cask of Amontillado (apparently a rare wine) in the cellar, but he wanted to be sure it was the real thing. After getting Fortunato rather drunk, he led him into the passage, all the while making comments that would have warned a sober man that he was in great danger. He also continued to play to Fortunato's ego, buttering him up with fawning comments on his wine expertise. When the duo arrived at a niche in the wall, Montressor told him the cask was inside. As Fortunato stumbled in, Montressor chained him to the wall with shackles ready for the deed. He then walled him in and left him to die in the dark, dank cellar. What did Fortunato do to deserve this horrible end? He insulted Montressor's reputation on a minor matter. The moral is don't let people play to your ego, and don't drink and walk underground with someone you've insulted!

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Where did Montresor and Fortunato search for Amontillado in "The Cask of Amontillado"?

In the short story "The Cask of Amontillado" by Edgar Allen Poe, the author has the victim lured underground. The reason the victim goes along so willingly with the invitation is that he is used to going there. Both he and the murderous narrator share a hobby/passion/business which involves sampling or collecting the finest wines, sherries or ports. They are well used to visiting catacombs or caves under streets and houses as that is where the most ambient temperature for storing wine has been for centuries. It is not surprising to the unwary victim to be invited down there to sample wine. Somewhere along the line, there has been a slur or some sort of insult that he seems to have forgotten, but the murderer (whose wine production goes back centuries) hasn't.

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Where does Montresor lead Fortunato in "The Cask of Amontillado"?

In "The Cask of Amontillado," Montresor gets revenge on Fortunato by carefully plotting and executing his murder. Montresor is determined to punish his enemy and takes several precautions to avoid suspicion. His black attire is inconspicuous, and he meets Fortunato during the carnival season, which is a merry, cheerful environment where no one would suspect that someone is in grave danger. Montresor approaches his enemy and wears a pleasant disposition to gain Fortunato's trust. Montresor also uses Fortunato's affinity for fine wines to his advantage by saying that he has purchased what seems to be amontillado. Fortunato is astonished that Montresor has acquired such fine wine during the carnival season and insists on trying the wine to authenticate it.

Fortunato falls for Montresor's trap and suggests that they travel to Montresor's vaults to taste the amontillado. Montresor feigns concern for Fortunato's health by informing him that the vaults are "insufferably damp" and "encrusted with nitre." Despite Montresor's argument, Fortunato insists on leaving the festivities, and Montresor leads his victim to his empty palazzo.

Once Fortunato arrives at Montresor's palazzo, Montresor leads him down a winding staircase into the dark, damp catacombs. Montresor and Fortunato proceed to travel through the extensive vaults, which go deep into the earth and underneath a riverbed. When Fortunato reaches the end of the vaults, Montresor quickly shackles him to a niche in the back wall and builds a wall to enclose his body. Montresor thus buries Fortunato alive, after which he keeps his secret to himself for fifty years.

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Where is Montresor bringing Fortunato?

Montresor brings Fortunato into the catacombs beneath his home. Montresor knows all his servants will be away enjoying the Mardi Gras celebrations, so his home is empty. Montresor leads the drunken Fortunato down a winding staircase into the dark, damp catacombs. Catacombs, or cemeteries the Romans built under ground, have ledges against the walls on which they put dead bodies, so they pass old bones. Their way is lit only by the two flambeaux or torches that they carry. A webwork of white mold lines the walls, causing Fortunato to cough. They pass under low arches, and the mold--or nitre--on the walls increases, making the walls look mossy. Finally, they enter into a crypt and at the end of it, a smaller crypt, lined on three sides with human bones. Beyond that is a small niche. This is the final destination, where Montresor chains Fortunato up and bricks him in to die. 

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