illustration of Fortunato standing in motley behind a mostly completed brick wall with a skull superimposed on the wall where his face should be

The Cask of Amontillado

by Edgar Allan Poe

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Luchesi's role and identity in "The Cask of Amontillado."

Summary:

In "The Cask of Amontillado," Luchesi serves as a minor character who never appears but is pivotal in Montresor's plan to lure Fortunato into the catacombs. Montresor uses Luchesi as bait by suggesting he will seek Luchesi's opinion on the Amontillado, knowing Fortunato's pride will compel him to prove his own superior knowledge of wine.

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What is Luchesi's role in "The Cask of Amontillado"?

Fortunato does not necessarily believe that Luchesi is an "ignoramus." In fact, he may believe that Luchesi is at least as knowledgeable about wines as himself. He is only telling Montresor that Luchesi is an ignoramus because that is what he wants him to think. Throughout the story Fortunato is apprehensive that Montresor will consult Luchesi, and Fortunato doesn't want the other man even to know about the existence of the Amontillado.

Montresor says he has bought one pipe (126 gallons) at a bargain price. There must still be a whole shipload of Amontillado in the harbor. Fortunato is not anxious to sample Montresor's wine in order to enjoy a glass or two. Amontillado is a good wine, but it is not rare; he could easily find a bottle in a liquor store if he was so fond of it. He is not anxious to sample it to show off his connoisseurship of wines. He is not anxious to go to all that trouble at that time of night in order to do a favor for a friend. Fortunato wants to make a big profit by buying as many casks of the Amontillado as he can and then selling it in bottles. He visualizes a whole shipload containing nothing but huge oaken casks of the finest Spanish sherry. But he has to sample it to make sure it is the real Amontillado.

Montresor has shown he is a shrewd judge of human character. He knows that Fortunato is already planning to tell him the wine he supposedly bought is only an ordinary sherry and then find the ship and buy up the entire cargo. Fortunato is rich and can become even richer. He will not only make a profit but consider his trickery an "excellent jest." Tricks like this are among the thousand injuries he had inflicted on Montresor over the years. Fortunato wears a jester's costume because he thinks of himself as a jester and trickster. Montresor knows he couldn't trust him to tell the truth about the Amontillado--if it existed. He would taste it, wrinkle his nose, shake his head, and say it was just ordinary Spanish sherry. Unfortunately for Fortunato, there is no Amontillado.

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What is Luchesi's role in "The Cask of Amontillado"?

Luchesi is a minor character in Edgar Allan Poe's short story, "The Cask of Amontillado." Luchesi never actually appears in the story, but he serves an important purpose as the bait to which Montresor is able to lure Fortunato into the catacombs. When Montresor tells Fortunato that he has a rare bottle of Amontillado for which he would like an expert's opinion, Montresor suggests that he will visit Luchesi instead of wasting Fortunato's time. 

     “As you are engaged, I am on my way to Luchesi. If any one has a critical turn it is he. He will tell me—”
     “Luchesi cannot tell Amontillado from Sherry.”
     “And yet some fools will have it that his taste is a match for your own.”
     “Come, let us go...”
     “My friend, no; I will not impose upon your good nature. I perceive you have an engagement. Luchesi—”
     “Let us go, nevertheless. The cold is merely nothing. Amontillado! You have been imposed upon. And as for Luchesi, he cannot distinguish Sherry from Amontillado.”

Of course, Montresor has counted upon this reaction from Fortunato, knowing that he will not pass up the chance to sample a rare vintage. Before taking the final steps to what will be Fortunato's final resting place, Fortunato has one more word about Luchesi:

"He (Luchesi) is an ignoramus."

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What is Luchesi's role in "The Cask of Amontillado"?

In Edgar Allan Poe's short story The Cask of Amontillado, "Luchesi" is an unseen character used by the story's narrator, Montresor, as a source of leverage. Montresor, of course, is plotting his revenge against Fortunato for a series of unspecified insults. He knows, however, that his intended victim, Fortunato, is not a man to be taken lightly, even in the inebriated state in which Montresor finds him. He also knows, however, that Fortunato is a man of considerable ego and that the best way of enticing Fortunato into his trap is by appealing to his vanity. By suggesting that he, Montresor, will ask this unseen character, Luchesi, about the cask of wine rather than asking Fortunato, he knows that the latter will rise to the bait. This is strongly hinted at in the following passage from early in Poe's story:

“As you are engaged, I am on my way to Luchesi. If any one has a critical turn, it is he. He will tell me——”

“Luchesi cannot tell Amontillado from Sherry.”

This one reference to Luchesi by Montresor does the trick. Fortunato takes the bait, but Montresor must continue to dangle the name of Luchesi before his victim to ensure Fortunato remains on track to enter the dungeon that awaits. That is why, Fortunato having entered the cellar of Montresor's home only to experience a respiratory episode caused by the foul mold-infected air in the basement, seems on the verge of turning around the leaving the home, thereby upsetting Montresor's plan to murder him. In order to prevent any such occurrence, Montresor again plays the "Luchesi" card: 

"You are rich, respected, admired, beloved;  you are happy, as once I was. You are a man to be missed. For me it is no matter. We will go back; you will be ill, and I cannot be responsible. Besides, there is Luchesi——”

The continued references to Luchesi are employed to ensure that Fortunato remains sufficiently intrigued and vain so as to continue along the path to his doom. Luchesi is never seen, but his presence is certainly felt.

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What is Luchesi's role in "The Cask of Amontillado"?

The man called Luchesi (Luchresi in some editions) has no role in the story. Montresor has concocted an intricate falsehood to lure Fortunato down into the catacombs below his palazzo. The only thing that could get Fortunato to follow him underground would be a rare wine. So Montresor tells Fortunato the following:

"My dear Fortunato, you are luckily met. How remarkably well you are looking to-day! But I have received a pipe of Amontillado, and I have my doubts....You were not to be found, and I was fearful of losing a bargain."

Montresor wants to ascertain whether Fortunato is expected anywhere that night, because he wants to leave a cold trail. So he says:

"As you are engaged, I am on my way to Luchesi. If any one has a critical turn, it is he. He will tell me."

This is one of Montresor many lies. He has no intention of going to Luchesi, obviously another connoisseur, but he wants to force Fortunato to accompany him to his palazzo that night. Fortunato is keenly interested in the Amontillado, but he doesn't have to taste a sample from Montresor's "pipe" (126 gallons!!!). The wine must have come in by ship, and he could easily find the ship and taste the wine aboard it.

By pretending to be in such a big hurry, Montresor gives the impression that he would buy more if he were sure it is genuine. He pretends he has to act quickly. The wine, of course, does not exist--which is why he could not go to Luchesi. Neither Montresor nor Fortunato is interested in buying the wine for private consumption. If there is a bargain to be had, they can buy a large quantity and sell it off in bottles at a profit. But Fortunato knows if he refuses to go with Montresor, then Luchesi will find out about it, and he will be competing with him, both bidding up the price.

The ruse is very complicated. Montresor cannot simply ask Fortunato to come to his home and sample some wine that night--and he knows it. He mentions Luchesi in order to make Fortunato fear having a third party find out about the availability of a shipment of Amontillado at a bargain price. Fortunato, as Montresor is well aware, is thinking of finding the Spanish ship and buying up the entire cargo. Montresor is a poor man and probably could only afford a few of the big 126-gallon pipes himself.

Luchesi, on the other hand, might be able to buy in quantity. What Fortunato fears is that Luchesi would go with Montresor, taste the wine, then try to buy up the entire cargo himself--assuming that it is genuine. Of course, Montresor is lying about going to Luchesi. This potential competitor Luchesi never appears in the story.

Montresor finally gets the information he wants when Fortunato says:

"I have no engagement; come."

Later when Fortunato finds himself chained to the rock wall, he will pretend that he did have an "engagement"--that he is expected at home and will be missed that night. He is trying to scare Montresor into setting him free and pretending the whole thing is "an excellent jest" in order to give Montresor an alibi, an excuse for releasing him.

"But is it not getting late? Will not they be awaiting us at the palazzo, the Lady Fortunato and the rest? Let us be gone."

But the cunning Montresor has already found out that Fortunato is not expected at home or anywhere else. His victim's disappearance will not be noted until tomorrow at the earliest. By then no one will remember seeing Fortunato or a shadowy figure beside him dressed all in black and wearing a black mask.

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What is Luchesi's role in "The Cask of Amontillado"?

Because Montresor recognizes that one of Fortunato's faults is his arrogance--he is proud of family, his position in society, his money, his expertise--Montresor uses this arrogance as the "bait" to get Fortunato to follow him into the catacombs to determine whether the Amontillado is genuine:

' As you are engaged, I am on my way to Luchesi.  If any one has a critical eye, it is he. [Fortunato's immediate and arrogant reply] is, 'Luchesi cannot tell Amontillado from Sherry.'

Of all the possible motivations to get Fortunato to go on this journey, Montresor knows that Fortunato's arrogance is the only fool-proof way to commit Fortunato to this journey.  Fortunato cannot stand the thought that someone else might have more skill than he does.  

Later, in the catacombs when Fortunato has a coughing fit, Montresor suggests that they go back, but he hooks Fortunato again by saying

'We will go back; you will be ill, and I cannot be responsible.  Besides there is Luchesi---'

As in the beginning, Montresor plays on Fortunato's arrogance to get him to continue on this journey, which is obviously detrimental to his health.  The last reference to Luchesi is designed to remind Fortunato that his knowledge of wine might easily replaced by Luchesi's skill, and that possibility is something Fortunato cannot allow.

Montresor, throughout the story, implies that Fortunato has done something horrible to Montresor.  It is important, then, that we see Fortunato as excessive in every respect--including his arrogance.

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What is Luchesi's role in "The Cask of Amontillado"?

Luchesi does not appear in the story but has an important role just the same. Fortunato does not need to go with Montresor to the underground vaults or catacombs in order to sample the Amontillado (if it existed). Once Fortunato learns that Amontillado is available for sale at a bargain price, he could easily find the seller for himself. No doubt a shipload of casks of Amontillado has just arrived in port--at least according to Montresor’s story). That ship (if it existed) would be easy for a man with Fortunato’s experience to find, and he could sample the wine aboard the ship and probably buy directly from the captain.

Montresor knows that Fortunato would think this way, because he has had plenty of dealings with the man in the past and has frequently been injured by him in business transactions. When Fortunato says, “Impossible!” he is only expressing his surprise that a shipload of gourmet wine should have arrived without his having heard about it. He assumes that he has missed out on this information because he has been drinking and carousing since the start of the carnival.

Montresor only entices Fortunato to his palazzo by telling him he is on his way to consult Luchesi. Fortunato doesn’t want Luchesi to hear about the shipload of Amontillado, because Luchesi would go searching for it on the waterfront himself. Then Fortunato would be competing with Luchesi in bargaining for the wine. If they bid the price up high enough, then Fortunato might be only able to purchase part of the cargo, while Luchesi got the other. Presumably either one of them would buy the entire shipload if they could get a bargain.

All three of these men would be interested in the Amontillado as merchandise on which to make a profit, and not for their own after-dinner consumption, although they might enjoy an occasional glass or two. Nobody needs 126 gallons of sherry for private consumption. The good thing about wine as merchandise is that it improves with age if it is contained in an oak barrel and thereby gains in value. So there would be no need for haste in retailing it.

Poor Montresor would have bought more than one cask if he had been sure of its quality, but he could not afford to buy the entire cargo of wine under any circumstances. At best he could buy another cask or two (if it existed!). So Fortunato decides to go with Montresor. The alternative, if Luchesi had not been mentioned, would have been to find the ship and sample the wine aboard it. But now what Fortunato is probably planning is to taste Montresor’s wine, shake his head, and tell him it is only ordinary sherry—then go looking for the ship, having eliminated both Montresor and Luchesi as potential competitors. And when Fortunato had beaten his competitors out of all the valuable Amontillado, he would laugh and call it “an excellent jest,” adding another injury to the thousand he has already committed against Montresor.

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What is Luchesi's role in "The Cask of Amontillado"?

The existence of Luchesi enables Montresor to lure Fortunato into his vaults more easily than saying he just needs Fortunato's advice. Luchesi is a way for Montresor to appeal to Fortunato's pride. Fortunato considers himself an expert in fine wine and his pride is hurt when Montresor says he will consult Luchesi. Montresor knows that one of Fortunato's main faults is pride and he therefore uses this trait against Fortunanto by constantly mentioning a possible rival to Fortunato's skills.

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What is Luchesi's role in "The Cask of Amontillado"?

I do not believe that Poe intended that his character Fortunato would actually want to give Montresor an honest opinion of the nonexistent Amontillado. I believe that Montresor was supposed to know in advance that if he told Fortunato he had bought a whole pipe of Amontillado at a "bargain" price, Fortunato would be mostly interested in getting in on this bargain himself. He would plan from the beginning to tell Montresor that the wine was not genuine but only ordinary Sherry--regardless of whether this was true or false. If the nonexistent wine had turned out to be ordinary Sherry, Fortunato would only be telling the plain truth. If it was genuine Amontillado, he would still declare it to be ordinary Sherry so as to eliminate Montresor as a buyer for more--and also to prevent Montresor from saying anything about it to the competitor named Luchesi. Montresor knows Fortunato's character. He has suffered similar "injuries" from him in business deals in the past. Fortunato, for his part, would consider it an "excellent jest" to cheat both Montresor and Luchesi out of an opportunity to buy genuine Amontillado at a bargain price.

Fortunato is not, in my opinion, interesting in helping a friend, or in displaying his "virtuosity" as a connoisseur of wines, or in drinking a glass of Amontillado in a dank catacomb full of human bones when he is inadequately dressed for such an excursion and has a bad cold. He is interested in the "bargain." He is a rich man. He could make a small fortune buying up a whole shipload of Amontillado in oak casks, bottling it, and selling it off at his leisure at a 100% markup. That type of wine only improves with age. So time was not an important factor in his calculations. In fact, Amontillado is highly regarded by gourmets just because it is aged.

Fortunato could not be interested both in displaying his connoisseurship and in declaring the wine to be ordinary Sherry if it is genuine Amontillado. It has to be one or the other. Montresor does not believe he can lure Fortunato into his catacombs just by appealing to his egotism. In threatening to go to Luchesi, he is actually threatening to let another man, presumably a business rival, in on the secret that a Spanish ship is selling off a shipload of Amontillado at a bargain price. This fact has supposedly escaped notice by Fortunato and Luchesi because of "the supreme madness of the carnival season."

If Montresor has already bought and paid for the cask of wine and has had it transported to his vaults, then what is the big hurry about getting an opinion about its quality. Why is he rushing around at night looking for Fortunato and then planning to rush off to Luchesi? It can only be because he wants to buy more! He would have bought more in the first place, but, as he keeps says, he has his doubts about the genuineness of the wine. If he were only sure it was high-quality Amontillado, he would immediately buy as many casks as he could afford. He wants to find out immediately whether or not the wine is true Amontillado. Once its arrival in Venice becomes common knowledge, because of the action of the law of supply and demand, it will no longer be available at a bargain price.

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In "The Cask of Amontillado," who is Luchesi and what purpose does he serve?

I have previously suggested that both Montresor and Fortunato are aristocrats but earn their livings by dealing in expensive goods such as paintings, antiques, jewelry (gemmary), and probably gourmet wines. This is implied in the third paragraph of the story which includes these sentences:

Few Italians have the true virtuoso spirit. For the most part their enthusiasm is adopted to suit the time and opportunity to practice imposture upon the British and Austrian millionaires. In painting and gemmary, Fortunato, like his countrymen, was a quack, but in the matter of old wines he was sincere.

When Montresor tells Fortunato that he has purchased a cask of Amontillado at a bargain price, Fortunato is naturally interested in buying some for himself. That is the main reason he wants to sample it. Montresor repeats that he has doubts about its genuineness. Obviously a ship carrying a whole cargo of the wine has recently arrived in Venice. Fortunato normally would have heard about it, but this is the height of the carnival and people have been neglecting business.

Fortunato would not need to sample Montresor’s wine. He could say he was too busy and would do it later. He would have no trouble finding a newly arrived Spanish ship loaded with big pipes of wine (each containing 126 gallons). That is why Montresor tells him

“As you are engaged, I am on my way to Luchesi.”

This is very good! He says, “I am on my way.” Time is of the essence. Luchesi must be another man who deals in luxury goods, another competitor. Fortunato does not want him to hear a word about the Amontillado. He accompanies Montresor to his vaults—not out of friendship or to show off his knowledge of wines, and certainly not to drink a glass of wine in a dank catacomb when he has a cold and is inadequately clothed--but in order to keep him from going to Luchesi. If Luchesi knew about the shipload of wine, he would find it quickly enough. Everybody on the waterfront would know about a newly arrived Spanish ship. Then Fortunato would have to be competing with the other aristocrat-connoisseur-businessman in bidding on the cargo. Both of them could sample the Amontillado (if it existed) aboard the ship to make sure it is genuine. There would be no need for either of them to taste Montresor’s wine.

Fortunato can afford to buy the whole shipload. Luchesi is probably able to do the same. Poor Montresor would be left with his one cask of Amontillado for whatever small profit he could make selling it in bottles. But Montresor knows Fortunato’s mind. Fortunato is already planning to taste the wine and tell him it is only ordinary sherry. Then, assuming it was genuine, Fortunato would go to find the captain of the Spanish ship. We can assume that tricks like these are among the “thousand injuries” Montresor has suffered over the years.

Why does he maintain relations with Fortunato? Fortunato is rich. Montresor may need to borrow money from him or to go into joint ventures with him if it is a question of buying an expensive item, such as an oil painting, for resale.

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In "The Cask of Amontillado," who is Luchesi and what purpose does he serve?

We cannot but fail to be in awe of Montresor, his criminal cunning and his psychological understanding of his enemy as he seems to know exactly what words to say and how to tempt Fortunato down into his catacombs and ever closer to his fate. We are not told who specifically Luchesi is, but we can infer that he is another nobleman, like Montresor and Fortunato, but one who has experience with wines and spirits, as Montresor says that he will go to Luchesi to verify if the drink he has obtained is Amontillado or not:

"As you are engaged, I am on my way to Luchesi. If anyone has a critical turn, it is he. He will tell me--"

Montresor knows what pride Fortunato takes in his knowledge of vintage Italian wines and how important this is to him. By subtley suggesting that Luchesi has more knowledge and skill in this area, by refering to his "critical turn," he is challenging Fortunato's sense of pride and his skill, thus ensuring that Fortunato, for his honour and pride, will follow him. Luchesi, then, is a character that we never meet, but whose purpose is to function as bait that Montresor calculatingly uses to reel Fortunato in to his trap.

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Who is Luchresi/Luchesi in Poe's "The Cask of Amontillado"?

I'm sure the person's name is Luchesi. Somehow it got spelled Luchresi in a few editions of the story, but most critics refer to him as Luchesi. This character never appears but is referred to by Montresor several times throughout the story. He is a wine connoisseur. When Montresor first encounters Fortunato in the street he tells him he needs someone to advise him whether the cask of wine he just bought is genuine Amontillado and says:

"Since you are engaged, I am on my way to Luchesi. If any one has a critical turn, it is he. He will tell me"--

This bit of dialogue has a dual purpose. Montresor is fishing: he wants to find out if Fortunato is expected anywhere that evening. If so, he would probably decide not to commit the murder on that occasion. He would like to leave a cold trail. He would prefer to have at least that night and the following day elapse before anyone missed his intended victim. He doesn't get the information he wants immediately. But when he repeats that he will consult Luchesi, Fortunato says:

"I have no engagement; come."

I have suggested elsewhere that all three men are "gentlemen-brokers" who survive in the declining city of Venice through buying and selling expensive things such as paintings, statues, gemmary (i.e. jewelry), and probably gourmet wines. The "pipe" of Amontillado Montresor claims to have bought would contain 126 gallons of wine. Fortunato is greatly interested because he would like to buy some himself--but he has to be sure it is genuine Amontillado. He knows that Luchesi would also be keen on buying some if he heard about it, and then he would be competing with Fortunato in bargaining with the seller. Montresor's apparently naive, innocent intention of consulting Luchesi motivates Fortunato to go to Montresor's palazzo that every night. Both Fortunato and Luchesi could probably afford to buy the entire shipment of Amontillado, whereas Montresor is a poor man and could probably only afford another two or three casks if he were assured by an expert that it was genuine.

Although Fortunato repeatedly disparages Luchesi's connoisseurship, he is deliberately lying in the hope of dissuading Montresor from consulting the other man. Fortunato is not eager to taste the nonexistent Amontillado because he is such a great wine-lover, or because he wishes to accommodate a friend, or because he wants to show of his expertise: he is hoping to make a lot of money by buying  many casks of gourmet wine and reselling it in quart bottles at a big profit. The good thing about wine as merchandise is that it improves with age if it is kept in wooden casks, so Fortunato (or Luchesi) could take their own sweet time about disposing of the Amontillado (if it really existed).

Finally, it is important to note that Fortunato would not have to go to Montresor's palazzo to taste the wine. Once he knows it is available for sale, he would have no trouble finding the ship that brought it into Venice. But if he makes some excuse (such as his cold) for not going that night, Montresor will go straight to Luchesi--and that is what Fortunato wants to forestall.

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What is Luchesi’s role in "The Cask of Amontillado"?

Montresor interests Fortunato in the nonexistent Amontillado by telling him that he bought it at a "bargain" price. Fortunato does not have to sample Montresor's Amontillado to make sure it is genuine before buying some of it, or all of it, himself. The wine must have arrived very recently aboard a ship from Barcelona. People, including dealers, haven't heard about it yet because it is "the supreme madness of the carnival," and everybody is neglecting ordinary business, including Fortunato himself. That is why it is, supposedly, a bargain. Fortunato could easily find that ship on the waterfront and taste the wine on board. Montresor knows this. Therefore he tells Fortunato he is on his way to find this Luchesi. Montresor appears anxious to get an opinion on his nonexistent Amontillado immediately. This can only be because it is now available at a bargain price, but it won't remain a bargain once word gets around that it has arrived in port. Fortunato does not want Luchesi to hear about the wine or the bargain price, so he is forced to accompany Montresor to his palazzo in spite of his bad cold and in spite of being inadequately dressed for the cold, dank catacombs. He disparages Luchesi as a wine connoisseur because he wants Montresor to depend on himself as judge. Montresor knows Fortunato from experience and understands that his friendly enemy is already planning to taste the (nonexistent) wine and declare it to be ordinary Sherry. Even before they leave the street he prepares Montresor for disappointment by saying, "You have been imposed upon." This will not only eliminate Luchesi as a possible competitor, but it will eliminate Montresor too. Montresor would not have pretended to be in such a hurry to get an opinion on his purchase if he didn't want to make Fortunato think he intended to buy more. He has already bought and paid for his pipe of Amontillado and had it moved to his palazzo--so why should he be so anxious to verify its quality now? Only because he would buy more if he were sure it was genuine.

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What is Luchesi’s role in "The Cask of Amontillado"?

Montresor seems almost as irritated by Luchesi as he is with Fortunado.  Like Forunado, Luchesi is another member of the high society that is beyond Montresor's reach.  He brings his name into the mix because he has contempt for him as well.

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What is Luchesi’s role in "The Cask of Amontillado"?

Luchesi is important to the story! That was the major impetus Montressor used to lure Fortunato into the scheme. Luchesi was used as an affront to Fortunato's pride "And yet some fools would consider him as knowledgable as you." From that moment Fortunato was hooked as he could not back down from that challenge.

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What is Luchesi’s role in "The Cask of Amontillado"?

Luchresi never enters the story in the form of a character.  He is simply someone whose name is used in order to get Fortunato's interest up enough to encourage him to jump at the chance to try the amontillado.  Luchresi, like Fortunato, is another wine expert.  Montresor threatens to take Luchresi to the coveted amontillado if Fortunato isn't interested.

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What is amontillado in "The Cask of Amontillado" and who is Luchesi?

Poe needed something to lure Fortunato underground where Montresor could chain him to the rock wall and leave him to die. Wine was the best lure because Fortunato loved wine and was already drunk when Montresor found him in the street. But what kind of wine? It obviously couldn't be Italian wine because there was an abundance of that at all times, and especially during the "supreme madness" of the carnival. Montresor couldn't say that it was French wine because he was French himself and was a connoisseur of wine. He twice offers Fortunato French wines when they are down in the catacombs: Medoc and De Grave. The only other alternative was a Spanish wine. The Spanish export a lot of sherry, and the finest sherry is Amontillado. Poe may have known very little about Amontillado sherry, but he only needed to know a little for story purposes. The Amontillado, of course, never really existed.

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What is amontillado in "The Cask of Amontillado" and who is Luchesi?

Amontillado is a pale dry sherry made in Montilla, a town in southern Spain.

Montresor (narrator) mentions Luchesi (an expert on wine) in the hope of luring Fortunado to his vaults to try his Amontillado; it works because Fortunado considers himself to be more of a connoisseur of wine than Luchesi. Therefore, pride turns out to Fortunado's fatal flaw.

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What is amontillado in "The Cask of Amontillado" and who is Luchesi?

Yes, amontillado is a wine. It is a kind of sherry.

Luchesi is a person, one who is supposed to be knowledgeable about wine.

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