Editor's Choice

What is targeted recruitment?

Expert Answers

An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

Targeted recruitment is the process by which organizations pay particular attention to individuals with certain characteristics when selecting them to fill a job position. The targeted individuals can be minorities, people with disabilities, or candidates with specific skills. The main goal of targeted recruitment is to diversify the workforce and to give the organization a wide array of options to choose from. The firm can also use this recruitment method to improve its image since the strategy shows that the company embraces diversity in the workforce. When organizations want to undertake targeted recruitment, they hire specific hiring agencies that specialize in enlisting individuals with the required special skills. These recruitment agencies help the organization to save time and money by finding a candidate in the shortest amount of time.

Approved by eNotes Editorial
An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

Targeted recruitment, as the name suggests, is recruitment targeted at a specific group. These groups could be people with a specific skill set, from a certain demography, of a certain under-represented group or ethnicity, etc. Examples could be targeted recruitment of under-represented groups such as females, Hispanics, African-Americans, native Americans, etc. These traditionally under-represented communities can be targeted for recruitment by advertising in magazines or newspapers typically read widely by these classes. Similarly, an industry may target people with a certain skill set. For example, Tesla may be targeting recruitment of people with a strong background in automation and robotics (to design driverless cars). Targeted recruitment helps an organization gain competency in a particular discipline or ensure that the workforce is diverse and representative of all sections of our society.

See eNotes Ad-Free

Start your 48-hour free trial to get access to more than 30,000 additional guides and more than 350,000 Homework Help questions answered by our experts.

Get 48 Hours Free Access
Approved by eNotes Editorial