The Bronze Bow Questions and Answers: Chapters 11-15

Elizabeth George Speare

Questions and Answers: Chapters 11-15

Questions
1. What does Daniel mean when he says that “the weakest one of them had defeated him”?

2. What is the only valuable object that Leah possessed? How is it symbolic?

3. How does Speare humanize the Roman soldier who comes to Daniel’s smithy?

4. Why do the village boys beat up Nathan?

5. What does Daniel give to Leah, and how does it affect her?

6. Why is the Good Samaritan parable important?

Answers
1. Leah, the weakest person Daniel knows, has compelled Daniel to leave his life on the mountain, where he felt free and enjoyed a life of action. By accepting responsibility of his sister, he has chosen a life that will tie him down to a job and caring for her needs.

2. The loom is the only object of value that Leah possesses. It symbolizes her worth and skill. Leah can make beautiful things from virtually nothing. The loom also proves the value of women’s work. Daniel is helpless to perform tasks that Leah can do with ease.

3. When the Roman solider comes to Daniel’s shop, Daniel sees that he is no older than Joel and himself. The Roman also acts politely, although Daniel, seething with hate, misinterprets why the soldier stands instead of taking a seat.

4. Nathan gets beaten up because his father works for the Roman tax collectors. To the Jews, there is virtually nothing worse, and Nathan receives the brute end of their disgust.

5. Daniel gives Leah a silver talent, payment for some of the work she has done on her loom. The money thrills Leah. Daniel realizes that she has never been materially compensated for her work. Leah proudly tucks the coin in her headdress and wears it constantly, even while she works. The money gives her pride in her job.

6. The Good Samaritan parable teaches that all people are capable of kindness and, most important, that the kingdom of God is inclusive of all people. This tenet will be the hardest for Daniel to accept and overcome.