What emotions does Daniel experience when he leaves his family for the mountains?

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Daniel feels incredibly lonely and distant whenever he returns to the mountain from his exciting, illuminating experience in the village. After spending five years on the mountain with Rosh and his band of selfish, greedy zealots, Daniel misses numerous opportunities to develop genuine friendships with adolescents his age. In his hometown, Daniel narrowly escapes several Roman soldiers and manages to survive a serious wound to his ribs, which happened during an altercation with a Roman soldier on his way back to the mountain. Fortunately, Malthace greets Daniel at the door and nurses him back to health in a hidden room in Hezron's home. While Daniel is recovering, he tells his life story to Malthace and Joel and the three make a pack to oppose the Romans for as long as they live. After establishing a genuine friendship with Malthace and Joel, Daniel returns to the mountain, where he is briefly treated as a hero before assuming his typical role. Rosh's men soon forget about Daniel, and he longs to interact with Malthace and Joel in his hometown. Daniel believes that the siblings appreciate him and genuinely care about his well-being, which is why he desires to return to the village.

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Daniel feels incredibly lonely when he returns to the mountain. While he was in the village, he was able to spend time with Joel and Malthace, recuperating from his injuries. During that time, the three youngsters pledged their lives for Israel and to drive out the Roman occupiers. Daniel's experiences as an insurgent clearly haven't dimmed his revolutionary ardor, despite his narrow escape and injury. If anything, he's become even more enthusiastic about his political goals and commitment thanks to the encouragement and moral support he receives from the twins.

Daniel establishes such a bond with Joel and Malthace that it's not surprising that he feels so lonely when he returns to the mountain. The men in the camp treat him like a hero for a short while, but after that they go back to ignoring him. No wonder, then, that Daniel should feel so lonely and that he should want to return to the village to see his close friends and comrades as soon as possible.

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How was Daniel feeling when he left Hezron's house and headed back toward the mountain?

Daniel feels completely miserable. Forbidden to ever return to Hezron’s home, Daniel forlornly heads back up the mountain. He also does not look forward to telling Rosh that he has failed to enlist Joel’s help in the cause. But even more than he dreads telling Rosh, he is more hurt by what he thinks is the loss of his first true friend, Joel. (Ch 6)

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