The Bronze Bow Connections and Further Reading
by Elizabeth George Speare

The Bronze Bow book cover
Start Your Free Trial

Download The Bronze Bow Study Guide

Subscribe Now

For Further Reference

(Beacham's Guide to Literature for Young Adults)

Commire, Anne, ed. Something about the Author. Vol. 5. Detroit: Gale Research, 1973. Summarizes her career and includes comments by Speare about her life and works.

Cosgrave, Mary Silvia. "Elizabeth George Speare—Newbery Award Winner." Library Journal 84 (April 15, 1959): 1291-1292. Biographical sketch of Speare's life.

Cross, Helen Reeder. "Elizabeth George Speare." In Newbery and Caldecott Medal Books: 1956-1965, edited by Lee Kingman. Boston: Horn Book, 1965. Cross reminisces about her acquaintance with Speare and provides background on Speare's life, noting that for Speare "home still comes first, writing second."

Fuller, Muriel, ed. More Junior Authors. New York: H. W. Wilson, 1963. Speare provides an autobiographical sketch, emphasizing her family life.

Speare, Elizabeth George. "Report of a Journey." In Newbery and Caldecott Medal Books: 1956-1965, edited by Lee Kingman. Boston: Horn Book, 1965. This is Speare's Newbery Medal acceptance speech. In it she discusses some of her concerns about writing The Bronze Bow and provides an account of how she developed the character Daniel.

Sutherland, Zena, and May Hill Arbuthnot. "Elizabeth George Speare." In Children and Books. 7th ed. Glenview, IL: Scott, Foresman, 1986. Summarizes The Bronze Bow, emphasizing its dark themes.

Bibliography and Further Reading

Ballantine, W. G. 1891. Messianic prophecy. The Old and New Testament Student 12(5): 262-266.

Brewbaker, James M. 1984. So you think you know young adult literature. The English Journal 73(7): 58-59.

Byrne, Brendan. 2001. Interpreting Romans theologically in a post-“new perspective” perspective. The Harvard Theological Review 94(3): 227-241.

Hajjar,...

(The entire section is 470 words.)