Sample Essay Outlines

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Last Updated on June 1, 2019, by eNotes Editorial. Word Count: 664

The following paper topics are based on the entire book. Following each topic is a thesis and sample outline. Use these as a starting point for your paper.

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  • Topic #1
    “The people who govern the Brave New World may not be sane (in what may be called the absolute sense of the word); but they are not madmen, and their aim is not anarchy, but social stability.” —Aldous Huxley

    Why is social stability judged to be so important? Illustrate with examples from the novel.

    Outline
    I. Thesis Statement: Societies that are stable within themselves do not have a reason for civil conflict or international war.

    II. Stable societies do not engender the want and need of civil war.
    A. All is provided for everyone.
    B. There is no desire or want since all is available.

    III. Stable societies do not need to take from others.
    A. If all is provided, there is no need for war.
    B. Envy and greed are not necessary.

    IV. Firm, constant control by a few is necessary for a stable
    society.
    A. People must think they have all they need, whether they do or not.
    B. Control must seem to be magnanimous.

  • Topic #2
    John the Savage is a combination of the two societies in which he exists. He is also an outsider in both. How does this make him the perfect foil to bring out the flaws in his new world?

    Outline
    I. Thesis Statement: As an outsider, John sees some of the paradoxes that exist in the New World.

    II. John sees religious influence in things although Mustapha Mond says that religion has become unnecessary.
    A. The sign of the T is made with reverence resembling the sign of the cross.
    B. The rites of the Solidarity Group resemble Christian communion rites.
    C. My Life and Work by Our Ford is designed to look like the Bible.

    III. Linda has told John that the Other Place is the perfect civilization.
    A. John loses his identity as a person and becomes the
    Savage.
    B. John cannot stand the constantly repetitive faces of the lower Bokanovsky Group castes.
    C. John does not understand why books like Shakespeare’s plays are not available even for the higher castes.
    D. John does not see that words like freedom have no meaning to any caste.

    IV. “Nothing costs enough here.” (The Savage)
    A. Social stability has caused man to lose his spirit.
    B. This New World has no place for martyrs or heroes: no sacrifice.

  • Topic #3
    John the Savage uses three of Shakespeare’s plays, The Tempest, Romeo and Juliet, and Othello, to express his emotions throughout the novel. Demonstrate how he uses certain words from the plays to express his thoughts.

    Outline
    I. Thesis Statement: Because John’s main reading has been from Shakespeare’s plays, they influence how he views both his worlds.

    II. John thinks of the words of Othello when he sees Linda or Lenina in an unfavorable situation.
    A. Iago in Othello uses the basest words to describe Desdemona with her imagined lover.
    B. John sees his mother as the lowest of women because of her free and open sex with Popé.
    C. When Lenina relates to John in sexual manner, words describing women as whores come to mind.

    III. When Bernard offers to take John to London, John uses Miranda’s speech from The Tempest to describe what he thinks the New World will be.
    A. When John visits the Electrical Equipment Corporation (Ch. XI), “O brave new world. . . .” sticks in his throat, causing him to vomit.
    B. By the end of the novel, John doesn’t even try to think of Miranda’s words to justify what he sees.

    IV. When thinking of the romanticized Lenina, Romeo’s words about Juliet fill John’s mind.
    A. When John first sees Lenina at the Reservation, he thinks of Juliet.
    B. In London, when John thinks of Lenina as he wishes her to be, he uses words describing Juliet.

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