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Last Updated on June 19, 2019, by eNotes Editorial. Word Count: 476

He shewed me a little thing, the quantity of an hazel-nut, in the palm of my hand; and it was as round as a ball. I looked thereupon with eye of my understanding, and thought: What may this be? And it was answered generally thus: it is all that is...

(The entire section contains 476 words.)

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He shewed me a little thing, the quantity of an hazel-nut, in the palm of my hand; and it was as round as a ball. I looked thereupon with eye of my understanding, and thought: What may this be? And it was answered generally thus: it is all that is made. I marvelled how it might last, for methought it might suddenly have fallen to naught for little[ness]. And I was answered in my understanding: It lasteth, and ever shall [last] for that God loveth it. And so All-thing hath the Being by the love of God.

This is one of Julian's physical visions, in which God shows her a concrete object, a hazel-nut, and brings her to understand that it is "all that is made." It represents the universe. Julian wonders how such a tiny thing can survive and realizes that it is sustained by the love of God. This passage shows Julian's understanding of the smallness of all creation against the vastness of God, and also, the simple, maternal, and sustaining tenderness of God's love. This is a comforting vision of God's goodness to creation.

And all this brought our Lord suddenly to my mind, and shewed these words, and said: I am Ground of thy beseeching: first it is my will that thou have it; and after, I make thee to will it; and after, I make thee to beseech it and thou beseechest it. How should it then be that thou shouldst not have thy beseeching?

The context of this passage is Julian's concern that we do not trust sufficiently in prayer, that it feels arid sometimes, and that we do not feel worthy enough that God should hear us. Here, God reassures Julian of the importance of prayer ("beseeching"), saying that he created humans for prayer, desires prayer, and because of that, she should not doubt God hears and wants to answer her. Again, Julian's God is loving and nurturing.

Wherefore He would have us understand that the noblest thing that ever He made is mankind: and the fullest Substance and the highest Virtue is the blessed Soul of Christ. And furthermore He would have us understand that his dear worthy Soul [of Manhood] was preciously knit to Him in the making [by Him of Manhood's Substantial Nature] which knot is so subtle and so mighty that (it)—[man's soul]—is oned into God: in which oneing it is made endlessly holy. Furthermore He would have us know that all the souls that shall be saved in Heaven without end, are knit and oned in this oneing and made holy in this holiness.

This passage affirms the high worth of humankind and expresses Julian's conviction that humans are knotted and knit together with God through Christ. Julian's God is not distant but intimately intertwined with the life of all believers.

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