Bless the Beasts and Children Additional Summary

Glendon Swarthout

Bibliography

(Masterpieces of American Literature)

Bridgers, Sue-Ellen. “Bless the Beasts and Children by Glendon Swarthout.” In Censored Books: Critical Viewpoints, edited by Nicholas J. Karolides, Lee Burress, and John M. Kean. Metuchen, N.J.: Scarecrow, 1993. An informative essay devoted to the reasons why Swarthout’s book has been censored.

Conner, John W. Review of Bless the Beasts and Children, by Glendon Swarthout. English Journal 61 (January, 1972): 139. The reviewer points to the book’s use of archetypal patterns and situations as well as exuberance and wit. Praises Swarthout for retaining a hold on the general populace and not relying on the avant-garde.

Garfield, Brian. Review of Bless the Beasts and Children, by Glendon Swarthout. Harper’s Magazine 240 (April, 1970): 107. Garfield calls Bless the Beasts and Children a compassionate and compelling drama about six adolescents who start out on a quest for “redemption, pride and justice.” The novel, Garfield says, is one superb example of what happens “when a writer’s craft is equal to the grandeur of his theme.”

Schickel, Richard. Review of Bless the Beasts and Children, by Glendon Swarthout. Saturday Review 53 (May 2, 1970): 29. Although Schickel calls the novel an exciting adventure story, he is careful to make the point that the novel uses adolescents as major characters but is not for adolescents. The death of Cotton, Schickel believes, is necessary, because the author needed an event of such magnitude to underline the proportions of the change in the characters.