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Chapter 3 Summary

My Breaking In

Darkie is growing handsome. His coat is fine and bright black, and he has one white foot and a white star on his forehead. His master will not sell him until he is four years old, believing boys do not work like men and colts should not work like grown-up horses. When Darkie is four, Squire Gordon comes to look at him. He examines Darkie’s eyes, mouth, and legs and has him walk, trot, and gallop while he watches. The Squire seems to like what he sees and says the horse will do quite well once he is broken in well. The master says he will break Darkie, as he does not want him hurt or frightened. He begins the next day.

Breaking a horse is teaching him to wear a saddle and bridle so that he can carry a person on his back and go where he is directed to go. A horse must also learn to wear a collar, a crupper, and a breeching, and he must learn to stand still while all of these things are being put on him. He must learn to have a cart or chaise fixed behind him and to go as fast or slow as the driver wishes. A horse must never get startled by anything he sees; he must never speak to other horses or express his own will by biting or kicking. Instead, he must follow the will of his master. Of greatest importance is that a horse must never jump with joy or lie down out of weariness once the harness is on him. Breaking a horse is an important thing.

Though Darkie has worn a halter and a headstall, the bridle is something new and unpleasant. The thick piece of steel inserted into his mouth and over his tongue until it settles into the corner of his mouth is “a nasty thing,” but Darkie knows his mother always wears one when she goes out, as do all grown-up horses. With the enticement of oats, kind words, and gentle pats, Darkie learns to wear his bit and bridle. Adjusting to the feel of the saddle is much easier for Darkie, and soon his master is able to ride on his back. Being ridden feels odd to Darkie, but he is proud to carry his master and is soon used to it.

The iron shoes he has to wear are unpleasant to think about, but his master comes with him to the forge to ensure Darkie is neither frightened nor hurt. First the blacksmith cuts off part of the horse’s hooves, and...

(The entire section is 861 words.)