Bettina von Arnim Criticism - Essay

Edith Waldstein (essay date 1988)

(Nineteenth-Century Literary Criticism)

SOURCE: Waldstein, Edith. “Political Communications and the Conversational Novel.” In Bettine von Arnim and the Politics of Romantic Conversation, pp. 59-93. Columbia, S.C.: Camden House, 1988.

[In the following excerpt, Waldstein refutes the common critical dismissal of Arnim's political writing as the work of a dilettante.]

The connection between Bettine von Arnim's cultural activity and the society in which she lived cannot be fully understood without a review of the social and political activities in which she was involved.1 This aspect of her life has until recently been overlooked in literary history. Critics tend either not to discuss it at all or...

(The entire section is 14948 words.)

Edith Waldstein (essay date 1992)

(Nineteenth-Century Literary Criticism)

SOURCE: Waldstein, Edith. “Goethe and Beyond: Bettine von Arnim's Correspondence with a Child and Günderode.1 In In the Shadow of Olympus: German Women Writers Around 1800, edited by Katherine R. Goodman and Edith Waldstein, pp. 95-113. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1992.

[In the following essay, Waldstein examines Goethe's Correspondence with a Child and Günderode, claiming that the difficulty critics have had classifying Arnim's work is due to the experimental nature of her writing.]

Bettine von Arnim first met Goethe in April 1807 in Weimar. From her own recollection of this occasion, one cannot infer much...

(The entire section is 8306 words.)

Katherine R. Goodman (essay date 1995)

(Nineteenth-Century Literary Criticism)

SOURCE: Goodman, Katherine R. “Through a Different Lens: Bettina Brentano-von Arnim's Views on Gender.” In Bettina Brentano-von Arnim: Gender and Politics, edited by Elke P. Frederiksen and Katherine R. Goodman, pp. 115-41. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1995.

[In the following essay, Goodman discusses Arnim's radical views on gender, claiming that Arnim rejected the traditional alignment of male and female traits as binary oppositions in favor of more diverse possibilities.]

Around 1800 polarized gender characterizations found permutations in a wide variety of literary, philosophical, anthropological, and political speculations. Binary terms, explicitly or...

(The entire section is 10143 words.)

Heinz Härtl (essay date 1995)

(Nineteenth-Century Literary Criticism)

SOURCE: Härtl, Heinz. “Bettina Brentano-von Arnim's Relations to the Young Hegelians.” In Bettina Brentano-von Arnim: Gender and Politics, edited by Elke P. Frederiksen and Katherine R. Goodman, pp. 145-84. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1995.

[In the following essay, Härtl explores the connections between Arnim's work and that of the Young Hegelians, particularly David Friedrich Strauß, and the attacks on both by the Prussian Protestant orthodoxy.]

The works of Bettina Brentano-von Arnim that earned her the greatest recognition were published in the years between 1835 and 1844. During that decade the Young Hegelians also published texts “more...

(The entire section is 15072 words.)

Claire Baldwin (essay date 1995)

(Nineteenth-Century Literary Criticism)

SOURCE: Baldwin, Claire. “Questioning the ‘Jewish Question’: Poetic Philosophy and Politics in Conversations with Demons.” In Bettina Brentano-von Arnim: Gender and Politics, edited by Elke P. Frederiksen and Katherine R. Goodman, pp. 213-43. Detroit: Wayne State University Press, 1995.

[In the following essay, Baldwin discusses Arnim's efforts on behalf of Germany's Jewish population in obtaining social and political freedom.]

In Bettina Brentano-von Arnim's famous letter of 1839 to Friedrich Karl Savigny, she includes among her political concerns the discrimination against Jews in Germany; she wishes to dedicate a “romantic heroes' fire” (ein...

(The entire section is 11460 words.)

Jeannine Blackwell (essay date 1997)

(Nineteenth-Century Literary Criticism)

SOURCE: Blackwell, Jeannine. “Laying the Rod to Rest: Narrative Strategies in Gisela and Bettina von Arnim's Fairy-Tale Novel Gritta.Marvels and Tales: Journal of Fairy-Tale Studies 11, nos. 1-2 (1997): 24-47.

[In the following essay, Blackwell discusses Gritta, written by Arnim and her daughter, as a story that reverses traditional fairy-tale conventions by representing females as active agents rather than passive victims.]

A notable lacuna in the literary history of German fairy tales is research on women's authorship and collecting activity. While many of the Grimms' female associates whose tales were transcribed have been identified,...

(The entire section is 10924 words.)

Helen G. Morris-Keitel (essay date 1997)

(Nineteenth-Century Literary Criticism)

SOURCE: Morris-Keitel, Helen G. “The Audience Should Be King: Bettina Brentano-von Arnim's ‘Tale of the Lucky Purse.’” Marvels and Tales: Journal of Fairy-Tale Studies 11, nos. 1-2 (1997): 48-60.

[In the following essay, Morris-Keitel considers “Tale of the Lucky Purse” as an example of a hybrid genre that combines a fairy-tale narrative and a dialogue with a royal audience.]

INTRODUCTION: SOCIAL PROSE OF THE VORMäRZ AND THE FAIRY TALE

The 1840s in the German states can perhaps best be characterized as a period of potential and real transition. Physicists describe such phases as unstable and full of activity as individual elements...

(The entire section is 5852 words.)

Ingrid E. Fry (essay date 2001)

(Nineteenth-Century Literary Criticism)

SOURCE: Fry, Ingrid E. “Elective Androgyny: Bettine Brentano-von Arnim and Margaret Fuller's Reception of Goethe.” Goethe Yearbook 10 (2001): 246-62.

[In the following essay, Fry discusses the way Arnim and Fuller, as talented women operating within the restrictions of their respective cultures, found inspiration for new versions of female identity in the works of Goethe.]

Well-educated European and American women of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century belonged to a cultural environment which placed a particularly high value on the individual and on the expression of individual genius. Cultural codes, however, confined women to pre-established,...

(The entire section is 7724 words.)