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Last Updated on May 6, 2015, by eNotes Editorial. Word Count: 514

Afnan, Soheil M. Avicenna: His Life and Works. London: George Allen and Unwin, 1958. The author stresses the impact of Avicenna’s philosophy upon the thinkers of the Arabic-speaking world.

Arberry, Arthur J. Avicenna on Theology . London: John Murray, 1951. This important brief work contains Avicenna’s own autobiography and...

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Afnan, Soheil M. Avicenna: His Life and Works. London: George Allen and Unwin, 1958. The author stresses the impact of Avicenna’s philosophy upon the thinkers of the Arabic-speaking world.

Arberry, Arthur J. Avicenna on Theology. London: John Murray, 1951. This important brief work contains Avicenna’s own autobiography and its continuation by his disciple and companion, Abu ‘Ubaid al-Juzjani, as well as Arberry’s discussion of Avicenna’s defense of monotheism and the immortality of the soul.

Avicenna. The Life of Ibn Sina: A Critical Edition. Translated by William E. Gohlman. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1974. Contains an annotated edition of Avicenna’s autobiography, the contemporary account of his life by al-Juzjani, and a critical examination of the bibliography about Avicenna.

Brown, H. V. B. “Avicenna and the Christian Philosophers in Baghdad.” In Islamic Philosophy and the Classical Tradition: Essays to Richard Walzer, edited by S. M. Stern, Albert Hourani, and Vivian Brown. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press, 1973. A clear presentation of Avicenna’s philosophical differences with both Aristotle and the Peripatetic thinkers of the Baghdad school, despite his fundamental adherence to the rationalism of Aristotelian traditions.

Copleston, Frederick. A History of Philosophy. Vol. 2. Westminster, Md.: Newman Press, 1955. Copleston clarifies not only the contributions of Arab philosophy to European medieval thought but also the diversity within this Islamic renaissance. Particular attention is focused upon Avicenna and Averroës.

Corbin, Henry. History of Islamic Philosophy. Translated by Liadain Sherrard. London: Kegan Paul, 1993. A detailed discussion of Islamic philosophy with a section on Avicenna.

Davidson, Herbert A. Proofs for Eternity and the Existence of God in Medieval Islamic and Jewish Philosophy. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1987. Davidson provides discussions of proofs of the existence of God in the philosophical writings of these two faiths, including Avicenna’s views.

Fakhry, Majid. A History of Islamic Philosophy. 1970. 2d ed. New York: Columbia University Press, 1983. Excellent presentation of Islamic philosophy with a long chapter on Avicenna.

Goodman, L. E. Avicenna. London: Routledge, 1992. A thorough account of Avicenna’s philosophy, sensitive to both his historical context and his contemporary relevance.

Leaman, Oliver. An Introduction to Medieval Islamic Philosophy. Cambridge, London: Cambridge University Press, 1985. Discussion, for beginners, of the issues in Islamic philosophy, including Avicenna.

Maurer, Armand A. Medieval Philosophy. New York: Random House, 1962. Reprint. Toronto: Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies, 1982. Maurer presents a summary of Avicenna’s arguments on being, necessity, and essence; on proofs for the existence of God; on the doctrine of creation; and on humankind’s intuitive knowledge of the soul. Although an Aristotelian, Avicenna, according to Maurer, also had links with the Neoplatonists and the later followers of Saint Augustine.

Nasr, S. H., and Oliver Leaman. History of Islamic Philosophy. Parts 1, 2. London: Routledge, 1996. Thorough treatment of Islamic philosophy with a chapter on Avicenna.

Ormsby, Eric L., Theodicy in Islamic Thought. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1984. Discussion of Al-Ghazzali’s Best of All Possible Worlds with multiple references to Avicenna.

Sharif, M. M., ed. A History of Muslim Philosophy. Vols. 1, 2. Wiesbaden, West Germany: Otto Harrassowitz, 1966. Multiauthored discussion of Islamic philosophy in connection with other disciplines.

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