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Last Updated on February 3, 2016, by eNotes Editorial. Word Count: 686

Bibliography

Anawati, Georges C. Mu'allafāt Ibn Sīnā. Cairo, 1950, 435 p.

Bibliography listing 276 titles attributed to Avicenna.

Biography

Avicenna. The Life of Ibn Sina: A Critical Edition and

Annotated Translation. Trans. William E. Gohlman. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1974. 163 p.

Contains the complete Arabic text...

(The entire section contains 686 words.)

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Bibliography

Anawati, Georges C. Mu'allafāt Ibn Sīnā. Cairo, 1950, 435 p.

Bibliography listing 276 titles attributed to Avicenna.

Biography

Avicenna. The Life of Ibn Sina: A Critical Edition and

Annotated Translation. Trans. William E. Gohlman. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1974. 163 p.

Contains the complete Arabic text and an English translation of Sir at al-Shaykh al-Ra'īs, Avicenna's autobiography, completed by his student Abū 'Ubayd al-Jūzjānī.

Criticism

Afnan, Soheil M. Avicenna: His Life and Works. London: George Allen & Unwin, 1958, 298 p.

Examines Avicenna's life and social milieu, and his approaches to logic, metaphysics, psychology, religion, and science in historical context.

Courtois, V., ed. Avicenna Commemoration Volume. Calcutta: Iran Society, 1956, 324 p.

Collection of essays on Avicenna's life and works, written in honor of the millenary of his birth. The book includes essays written in English, German, French, and Arabic.

Craig, William Lane. "Ibn Sīnā." In The Cosmological Argument from Plato to Leibniz, pp. 86-98. London: Macmillan, 1980.

Outlines Avicenna's arguments for the existence of God.

Goodman, Lenn E. Avicenna. London: Routledge, 1992, 240 p.

Discusses Avicenna's life in historical context; his metaphysics, especially his synthesis of necessity and contingency, and his distinction between essence and existence; his arguments for the immortality of the soul; and his views on logic, rhetoric, and poetics.

Heath, Peter. "Allegory and Philosophy." In Allegory and Philosophy in Avicenna (Ibn Sînâ); with a Translation of the Book of the Prophet Muhammad's Ascent to Heaven, pp. 33-106. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 1992.

Examines "the degree to which Avicenna's cosmological, psychological, and epistemological theories find parallel, if diverse, expression in the different formats of philosophical exposition and allegorical narration."

Houben, J. "Avicenna and Mysticism." Indo-Irancia VI, No. 3 (January 1953): 1-17.

Explores Avicenna's ideas in relation to mid-Eastern mysticism and claims that Avicenna's philosophy is not mystical because of his monism and his (over)emphasis on reason.

Marmura, Michael. "Avicenna's Psychological Proof of Prophecy." Journal of Near Eastern Studies XXII, No. 1 (January 1963): 49-56.

Elucidates Avicenna's argument for the existence of prophetic ability.

Morewedge, Parviz. "A Third Version of the Ontological Argument in the Ibn Sīnian Metaphysics." In Islamic Philosophical Theology, edited by Parviz Morewedge, pp. 188-222. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1979.

Examines Avicenna's concept of the Necessary Existent in his argument for God's existence, with special focus on the argument's experiential, "mystical" approach.

Nasr, Seyyed Hossein. "Ibn Sīnā." In An Introduction to Islamic Cosmological Doctrines: Conceptions of Nature and Methods Used for Its Study by the Ikhwān Al-Safā, Al-Bīrūnī, and Ibn Sīnā, rev. ed., pp. 175-274. Albany: State University of New York Press, 1993.

Explores Avicenna's metaphysics and natural philosophy, and in particular his views on the relation between man and the universe.

Nogales, Salvador Gómez. "Ibn Sina." In Religion, Learning, and Science in the 'Abbasid Period, edited by M. J. L. Young, J. D. Latham, and R. B. Serjeant, pp. 389-404. Cambridge University Press, 1990.

Claims that, rather than merely having transmitted Greek ideas, Avicenna uniquely fused Islamic religion and philosophy.

Riordan, Joseph D. "God, Intellect, and Avicenna." In God Knowable and Unknowable, edited by Robert J. Roth, pp. 23-41. New York: Fordham University Press, 1973.

Contrasts European philosophy, as typified by Averroës and a neglect of a mystical relationship with God, with the philosophy of Islam, as represented by Avicenna and the preservation of "intellectual intuition."

Siraisi, Nancy G. Avicenna in Renaissance Italy: The "Canon" and Medical Teaching in Italian Universities after 1500. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1987, 410 p.

Explores the reception of Avicenna's Canon on Medicine in Italy and its use as a standard text on medical theory and physiology. Siraisi discusses the Canon's Italian commentators and translators, and includes a bibliography of Latin editions of the Canon and commentary written after 1500.

Wickens, G. M., ed. Avicenna: Scientist & Philosopher; a Millenary Symposium. London: Luzac & Company, 1952, 128 p.

A collection of six essays discussing Avicenna's life and his influence on the development of Arabic philosophy, on Jewish thought, on Medieval science, and on the thirteenth-century West.

Additional coverage of Avicenna's life and career is contained in the following source published by Gale Research: Dictionary of Literary Biography, Vol. 115.

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