In "Araby" by James Joyce, how does the narrator feel about Mangan's sister and why?

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Araby by James Joyce is one of the short stories from the Dubliners series in which Joyce explores various life stages or potentially transformative events which stand to change the lives or circumstances of the characters.  

The boy in Araby is infatuated by Mangan's sister and is apparently coming to an age where awareness of, in this case, girls, is still bewildering. Even the boy does not really understand his feelings, his "confused adoration." He has barely ever said a word to her and yet he idolizes her. Thoughts of her invade all his activities and he takes every opportunity to watch or think of her:

My body was like a harp and her words and gestures were like fingers running upon the wires. 

The first time she speaks to him he is overcome by the "curve of her neck" and does not remember part of their conversation, only that he is alone with her. He undertakes to being her something from the local bazaar and is then consumed by all thoughts of the forthcoming event. Only later does he accept that she will not have waited with the same anticipation. 

The boy's thoughts are typical of a young boy beginning to explore his attachment to girls and the emotional feelings that accompany his expectations. He barely knows what to expect but, when he does actually make it to the bazaar, he is overcome by his confusion and, instead of buying something, he stands dazed and somewhat perplexed by the situation. He has been so eager to go to the bazaar and to bring something back for the girl but, now that he has the opportunity, he is unable to complete the transaction which would have transferred his childish imaginings and adoration into something more concrete which maybe he is not ready for. The boy comes to a realization that perhaps his feelings were exaggerated and more about himself than the girl.  

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Describe the character of the protagonist in James Joyce's "Araby." How does the protagonist feel towards Mangan's sister?

The unnamed boy is young, innocent, naive. His deeply unhappy home life causes him to fantasize about an exotic, more exciting world in which all his deepest, most heartfelt dreams come true. The bazaar is that world—or at least it appears to be.

Sadly for the boy, Araby turns out to be every bit as much of a disappointment as his ordinary everyday life, with its seemingly endless disappointments. All he wanted to do was buy Mangan's sister a gift, something special that would show how deeply he feels towards her. But he's unable to do even that.

The darkness that descends upon the bazaar represents the end of his dreams, the onset of a profound disillusionment with a harsh adult world. For the boy, this is the end of innocence. Araby, like his infatuation for Mangan's sister, was all just an illusion.

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Describe the character of the protagonist in James Joyce's "Araby." How does the protagonist feel towards Mangan's sister?

The nameless protagonist of James Joyce's "Araby" is an innocent, idealistic boy who is also something of a romantic. He's obsessed with the books in the library in his house, one of which is a historical romance. It's hardly surprising that the narrator idealizes Mangan's sister and views his crush on her as the perfect romance. Indeed, once the narrator promises to bring Mangan's sister back something from the bazaar, Araby, he becomes increasingly obsessed with the notion of winning her love and begins to neglect all other aspects of his daily routine.

Given his extreme obsession for Mangan's sister, the narrator's epiphany at the end of the story is especially crushing. Realizing that he has been controlled by idealistic, childish impulses, the narrator seems to set aside his ambitions to impress Mangan's sister and prepares instead to join the ranks of disillusioned adults. 

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