Which lines in "Annabel Lee" indicate Annabel's death?

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I would say that the tragic underpinnings of "Annabel Lee" are revealed gradually and incrementally within the poem. For most of the first two Stanzas, Poe's narrator focuses upon their intense love for one another, without yet giving any hint that one of the two is deceased. This begins to change in the last two lines of the second stanza, which reveals that "the wingèd seraphs of Heaven / Coveted her and me." This imagery introduces the first hints of a much darker story still to be revealed. It has not yet been stated unequivocally, but we've been given a suggestion as to the tragic realities still to be divulged.

Then, in the next stanza, Poe introduces Annabel's "highborn kinsmen" who come to take Annabel Lee away from him, "to shut her up in a sepulchre / In this kingdom by the sea." Note the specific wording here: sepulchre is a word that means tomb. By this point, the fate which had earlier been alluded to (with his allusion to heaven) is starting to become clear. But it will not be until the next stanza that Poe baldly states what happened and unequivocally reveals that Annabel is deceased: "Then the wind came out of the cloud by night, / Chilling and killing my Annabel Lee."

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I feel that there are two specific lines in this poem that point readers toward the fact that Annabel Lee has died.

The first line is in the third stanza.

So that her highborn kinsmen came
And bore her away from me,
To shut her up in a sepulchre
In this kingdom by the sea.
The narrator of the poem tells readers that Annabel Lee was taken away from him by some of her relatives. They took her to a sepulchre. A sepulchre is a tomb, and tombs hold dead people. Annabel Lee must be dead if her relatives put her in a tomb. Although, Poe does have a tendency to write about people being buried alive, so I suppose that she could be alive at this point.
The following lines clearly explain that Annabel Lee is dead.
That the wind came out of the cloud by night,
Chilling and killing my Annabel Lee.
The above lines are in stanza four, and they explain why stanza three's cold wind is an important detail.
The final two lines of the poem also tell readers that Annabel Lee is dead. They reiterate that Annabel Lee is buried near the sea.
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What lines inform of Annabel’s death in "Annabel Lee"?

In Edgar Allan Poe's poem "Annabel Lee," there are actually a few lines that convey the death of his beloved maiden whose only thought was to "love and be loved by" the speaker.

In stanza three, the tone shifts from one of adoration to a more somber reflection. In lines three and four in this stanza, he recalls,

A wind blew out of a cloud, chilling
My beautiful Annabel Lee;
A wind here is used symbolically to represent death. Clouds often represent an ominous force in nature, and this force chills, or takes the life from, Annabel Lee.
Next, the speaker notes the immediate course of action taken by her family:
So that her highborn kinsmen came
And bore her away from me,
Annabel Lee was from a prominent family, and it is conveyed in these lines that they do not look with favor upon the speaker. Note that he is not allowed to accompany them or follow his beloved. Instead, she is simply taken from him.
The end of this stanza explains what her family does with the body:
To shut her up in a sepulchre
In this kingdom by the sea.
She is sealed in a tomb by the sea, and the speaker spends his nights at this tomb remembering the love he once shared with his beautiful Annabel Lee.

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