Andrew Jackson's Presidency

Start Free Trial

Student Question

What was the significance of Andrew Jackson's 1828 presidential election?

Expert Answers

An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles
Andrew Jackson was popularly elected, and was just plain popular. This made him different. Jackson was the people's president. He appealed to the common folk. He was also a democrat, and not a political insider like many of his predecessors.
Approved by eNotes Editorial
An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

Something that is very important about Andrew Jackson's presidential election is that he was a common man. He was not raised in a wealthy household and worked very hard to educate himself in law. This marks a great deal of importance because he was more representative of the everyday man.

He was a very proud man who would just about anything to hold up his good name.

Another important aspect about the presidency of Andrew Jackson is that two official parties grew during this time period-the democrats and the whigs. Andrew jackson was a democrat. This marks a very important part of American history.

Approved by eNotes Editorial
An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

Everything the previous answers say is true, but let me try to put the answer a bit more simply.  I am hoping this will help you see the major point more clearly.

Jackson's election is usually called a triumph for the common American.  Jackson was the first president to be born to a poor family.  Before him, all the presidents had been from the rich elite.

This is important because America was becoming more democratic in the 1820s.  By the end of this decade, practically all white men over 21 were allowed to vote.  Before, only those with some amount of property (it varied by state) had been allowed to vote.

So Jackson's election is significant because it showed how democratic the US was becoming.

Approved by eNotes Editorial
An illustration of the letter 'A' in a speech bubbles

The emergence of Jackson in the election of 1828 was significant because of his posture as "the common man's" candidate.  Jackson was one of the first Presidents elected who did not have the Federalist pedigree of prior candidates.  At the same time, he did not possess the "insider" status of his opponent John Quincy Adams.  The outsider status that was conferred upon Jackson was highlighted by the large extent of "dirty politics" which emerged through the campaign.  Jackson made claims, valid or invalid depending on partisanship, of the misuse of political funds.  Adams and his associates made claims towards Jackson's fidelity in marriage, and a ruthless temper during his time as a commander in the Army.  A truly excellent example of what modern politics would bring to American Discourse, the election of Jackson proved that the dialogue of popular sovereignty and other principles of the Constitution that permeated beliefs no more than 50 years prior would forever be dragged through the sewage of the modern swamp of politics.

See eNotes Ad-Free

Start your 48-hour free trial to get access to more than 30,000 additional guides and more than 350,000 Homework Help questions answered by our experts.

Get 48 Hours Free Access
Approved by eNotes Editorial