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Last Updated on June 7, 2022, by eNotes Editorial. Word Count: 242

CRITICISM

Barrett, David. “Collected Works.” New Scientist 155, No. 2091 (19 July 1997): 48.

Barrett discusses a variety of novels, including Ghosh's The Calcutta Chromosome, that are considered science fiction, yet also exhibit aspects of other literary genres.

Brawarsky, Sandee. “Mortality, Mosquitoes, and Mystery.” Lancet 348, No. 9043 (21 December...

(The entire section contains 242 words.)

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CRITICISM

Barrett, David. “Collected Works.” New Scientist 155, No. 2091 (19 July 1997): 48.

Barrett discusses a variety of novels, including Ghosh's The Calcutta Chromosome, that are considered science fiction, yet also exhibit aspects of other literary genres.

Brawarsky, Sandee. “Mortality, Mosquitoes, and Mystery.” Lancet 348, No. 9043 (21 December 1996): 1717.

Brawarsky offers a positive assessment of The Calcutta Chromosome, complimenting the novel from a scientific standpoint.

Hayward, Helen. “Once a Golden Land.” Times Literary Supplement, No. 5076 (14 July 2000): 21.

Hayward offers a positive assessment of The Glass Palace.

Mongia, Padmini. “Postcolonial Identity and Gender Boundaries in Amitav Ghosh's The Shadow Lines.College Literature 19, No. 3 (October 1992): 225–229.

Mongia addresses the cultural and gender based impact that post-colonialism has on modern literature, using The Shadow Lines as her prime example.

Somtow, S. P. “Variations on an Indian Theme.” Washington Post Book World (16 July 1989): 9.

Somtow offers a mixed assessment of The Shadow Lines, praising certain subplots in the novel, but arguing that Ghosh's nonlinear style of writing is confusing and difficult for readers to follow.

Sudrann, Jean. “Goings and Comings.” Yale Review 79, No. 3 (Spring 1990): 414–438.

Sudrann analyzes the diaspora of the characters and their tactics for establishing a sense of “home,” in Saul Bellow's The Bellarosa Connection, Anita Brookner's Latecomers, Anita Desai's Baumgartner's Bombay, Marina Warner's The Lost Father, and Ghosh's The Shadow Lines.

Additional coverage of Ghosh's life and career is contained in the following sources published by the Gale Group: Contemporary Authors, Vol. 147; Contemporary Authors New Revision Series, Vol. 80; Contemporary Novelists; and Literature Resource Center.

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Criticism