Bibliography

Sources for Further Study

Braiterman, Zachary. (God) After Auschwitz: Tradition and Change in Post-Holocaust Thought. Princeton, N.J.: Princeton University Press, 1998. Braiterman thoughtfully interprets and assesses Richard L. Rubenstein’s contributions to debate about God’s relation to history and to the Holocaust in particular.

Cohn-Sherbok, Dan. Holocaust Theology. London: Lamp Press, 1989. Surveying various theological responses to the Holocaust, this book contains a good introductory chapter about Rubenstein’s thought written by a well-qualified interpreter of his work.

Haynes, Stephen R., and John K. Roth, eds. The Death of God Movement and the Holocaust: Radical Theology Encounters the Shoah. Westport, Conn.: Greenwood Press, 1999. Rubenstein joins other scholars, including Thomas Altizer, William Hamilton, and Paul van Buren, to discuss retrospectively the Holocaust’s impact on the “death of God” movement in theology.

Jacobs, Steven L., ed. The Holocaust Now: Contemporary Christian and Jewish Thought. East Rockaway, N.Y.: Cummings and Hathaway, 1996. This work features significant essays on post-Holocaust theology that frequently address Rubenstein’s concerns and theories.

Katz, Stephen T. Post-Holocaust Dialogues: Critical Studies in Modern Jewish Thought. New York: New York University Press, 1983. In this noteworthy study, an important Jewish philosopher and Holocaust scholar includes a critical discussion of Rubenstein’s work and its implications.

Roth, John K., ed. Ethics After the Holocaust: Perspectives, Critiques, and Responses. St. Paul, Minn.: Paragon House, 1999. In a dialogue format, Leonard Grob, Peter J. Haas, David Hirsch, David Patterson, Didier Pollefeyt, and John K. Roth discuss post-Holocaust ethics in ways that often draw on Rubenstein’s thought.

Rubenstein, Betty Rogers, and Michael Berenbaum, eds. What Kind of God? Essays in Honor of Richard L. Rubenstein. Lanham, Md.: University Press of America, 1995. This valuable book contains extensive biographical and bibliographical information about Rubenstein as well as significant essays about his work by important Holocaust scholars, philosophers, and theologians.

Sontag, Frederick, and John K. Roth. “The Death of God in American Theology.” In The American Religious Experience: The Roots, Trends, and Future of American Theology. New York: Harper & Row, 1972. Rubenstein’s work is discussed in a chapter on “The Death of God in American Theology.”

Zvielli, Alexander. “Routine Murder.” Jerusalem Post, November 6, 1992, p. 26.