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The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn

by Mark Twain

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Suggest a discussion question for Chapters 28-29 of The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn.

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  • What does it say about the King that he refuses to admit to the fraud against the Wilks family to the very end? 
  • What differences between the King and the Duke become clear in these chapters? 
  • Characterize Huck's behavior and his role in these two chapters. (Is he brave, cowardly, smart, not smart, creative, crafty, loyal, good, bad, etc.?)
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I have always been interested in Huck's reaction to Mary Jane.  He seems like a simple boy, but I think he has more than his usual detached interest in Mary Jane.  It is one of the first times he genuinely cares for another person.  He is learning to care about Jim.

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I think two interesting discussion questions would be...

1. How has Huck developed as a human being? Comparing and contrasting the earlier chapters with the latter ones.

2. What connection is there between Huck's heightened sense of clarity and the river? (As opposed to his experiences on land)

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Two good discussion questions would be

1. How does Huck plan to get the gold back for the girls?

Huck plans to steal the money from under the mattress and then hide it until the king and duke are gone. He will then let Mary Jane know where the money is hidden.

2. What is different about his episode that others that Huck has been involved in?  This time Huck seems to really care about the Wilks sisters, especially Mary Jane. He is willing to take action himself in order to save them.

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