The Adventure of the Speckled Band by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle

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What happens in The Adventure of the Speckled Band?

In The Adventure of the Speckled Band, Sherlock Holmes investigates the case of a young bride to be who fears that she'll be murdered. Helen Stoner, the stepdaughter of Sir Grimesby Roylott, has reason to believe that her stepfather killed her sister—she just doesn't know how. At the end, Holmes discovers that Roylott was using a snake (the "speckled band").

  • Helen Stoner visits Holmes and Watson, fearing for her life. Her sister died suddenly not long before her wedding. Now that Helen is to be married, she worries that she will meet the same fate.

  • Holmes agrees to take the case, but before he can leave his home, he receives a visit from a very irate Roylott, who threatens him. Holmes is undeterred and takes the case anyway.

  • Holmes discovers that Roylott wants to kill his step daughters in order to maintain control over their inheritance. He sent a snake (the speckled band) through the air vents to poison them in their sleep. In the end, the snake turns against Roylott and he is killed.

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Summary

(Comprehensive Guide to Short Stories, Critical Edition)

Sherlock Holmes and Dr. Watson rise unusually early one morning to meet Helen Stoner, a young woman who fears that her life is being threatened by her stepfather, Sir Grimesby Roylott, a doctor who practiced in India and who was married to Helen’s mother there. Helen’s sister has died almost two years earlier, shortly before she was to be married. Helen had heard her sister’s dying words, “The speckled band!” but had been unable to understand their meaning. Now Helen, too, is engaged, and she has begun to hear strange noises and to observe strange activities around Stoke Moran, the estate where she and her stepfather live.

Sir Grimesby Roylott does keep strange company at the estate. He befriends a band of Gypsies on the property and keeps as pets a cheetah and a baboon. For some time, he has been making modifications to the house: Before Helen’s sister’s death, he had modifications made inside the house, and now he is having the outside wall repaired, forcing Helen to move into the room where her sister died.

Holmes listens carefully to Helen’s story and agrees to take the case. He plans a visit to the manor later in the day. Before he can leave, however, he is visited by Roylott, who threatens him should he interfere. Undaunted, Holmes proceeds, first to the courthouse, where he examines Helen’s mother’s will, and then to the countryside.

At Stoke Moran, Holmes inspects the premises carefully inside and out. Among the strange features that he discovers are a bed anchored to the floor, a bell cord that does not work, and a ventilator hole between Helen’s room and that of Roylott.

Holmes and Watson arrange to spend the night in Helen’s room. In darkness they wait; suddenly, a slight metallic noise and a dim light through the ventilator prompt Holmes to action. Quickly lighting a candle, he discovers on the bell cord the “speckled band”—a poisonous snake. He strikes the snake with a stick, driving it back through the ventilator; agitated, it attacks Roylott, who had been waiting for it to return after killing Helen. Holmes reveals to Watson that Roylott plotted to remove both daughters before they married because he would have lost most of the fortune he controlled when the daughters took with them the money left them by their mother.

Summary

(Masterpieces of World Literature, Critical Edition)

“The Adventure of the Speckled Band” is probably the most famous of Sherlock Holmes’s cases, not only because of its diabolical plot about a stepfather preventing his twin daughters from marrying and thereby diminishing his income from his deceased wife’s estate, but also because it so perfectly realizes the pattern of detection that became Holmes’s trademark. Watson opens the story with the information that he has been freed to tell this story by the premature death of the client, Helen Stoner.

Helen comes to Holmes and Watson in April, 1883, terrified that she may meet the same fate as her sister, who died mysteriously two years...

(The entire section is 1,384 words.)