I want to do a paper on justice, contrasting Nancy Fraser with John Rawls. Could you please let me know which of Fraser's books better provides her critical perspective on Rawls Theory of Justice?...

I want to do a paper on justice, contrasting Nancy Fraser with John Rawls. Could you please let me know which of Fraser's books better provides her critical perspective on Rawls Theory of Justice?

Thank you.

tavistok

Asked on by tavistok

1 Answer | Add Yours

kplhardison's profile pic

Karen P.L. Hardison | College Teacher | eNotes Employee

Posted on

There are three books in which Fraser addresses her theory of justice. The one published in 2013 is a collection of her essays in which justice is predominantly addressed in the second section.

  • Fraser, Nancy (1997). Justice interruptus: critical reflections on the "postsocialist" condition. New York: Routledge. ISBN 9780415917940.
  • Fraser, Nancy (2009). Scales of justice: reimagining political space in a globalizing world. New York: Columbia University Press. ISBN 9780231519625.
  • Fraser, Nancy (2013). Fortunes of feminism: from state-managed capitalism to neoliberal crisis. Brooklyn, New York: Verso Books. ISBN 9781844679850.

There are two articles available online in which she addresses ideas of justice. One is "Rethinking Recognition" and the other is "How feminism became capitalism's handmaiden - and how to reclaim it." A third article, "On Justice: Lessons from Plato, Rawls and Ishiguro," can be purchased through an online source. You are asked to "Please login on the left to read more or buy the article for £3." [Most websites that list purchase price in £s (GBPs) have an automatic function that converts to $s (USDs) if you are in America and may have a similar automatic conversion function for other currencies.]

Fraser's books and essays address the entire scope of or separate elements of her theory of justice, which divides the concept of justice into the three distinctly separate but closely interrelated conceptual dimensions of resource distribution, contribution recognition, and linguistic representation.

For instance, in "Rethinking Recognition" Fraser addresses the turn away from justice that has been undertaken since the 1970s and -80s when "recognition" meant to "assert hitherto denied identities but to bring a richer, lateral dimension to battles over the redistribution of wealth and power." She rightly observes that "recognition" has resulted in waves of genocide and ethnic cleansing: "questions of ‘identity’ have fuelled campaigns for ethnic cleansing and even genocide—as well as movements that have mobilized to resist them."

While in "How feminism became capitalism's handmaiden" Fraser laments the turn away from the original "fighting to emancipate women ... building a better world – more egalitarian, just and free" toward "new forms of inequality and exploitation" as expressed in individualistic capitalism and entrepreneurism.

Sources:

We’ve answered 318,989 questions. We can answer yours, too.

Ask a question