I have a list of 100 vocabulary words and want to set up a 3 word/day system with advancing only after mastery. Program or site to manage this?I want to provide my own definitions, but would like...

I have a list of 100 vocabulary words and want to set up a 3 word/day system with advancing only after mastery. Program or site to manage this?

I want to provide my own definitions, but would like to use a program to manage the "random" factor once the student's list gets over 12-15 words. Have any of you used any such program or service? I really don't want to build it myself. Surely something like this already exists! Advice please. (Read 180 level students)

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dmcgillem's profile pic

dmcgillem | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Assistant Educator

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I have a list of 100 vocabulary words and want to set up a 3 word/day system with advancing only after mastery. Program or site to manage this?

I want to provide my own definitions, but would like to use a program to manage the "random" factor once the student's list gets over 12-15 words. Have any of you used any such program or service? I really don't want to build it myself. Surely something like this already exists! Advice please. (Read 180 level students)

I applaud your intentions but wonder at the level of mastery that you've referred to.  Research has shown that for high ability students, it takes only an average of four exposures to gain mastery of a term.  Average students require approximately 14, and struggling students can require as many as 400 exposures (over time) to achieve mastery.  I hope you are able to find a program that can take into account students varying levels of ability.  Some may only make it through the first 25 words all year, and some might finish the list of 100 in the first quarter.

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wordprof | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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I taught inflections, and grouped vocabulary words together by prefixes and suffixes.  One thing is more important than simply building a student's vocabulary -- showing then how words are constructed, how they form.  One game I used to play with them was "Neologist," in which they invented words by putting prefixes and suffixes on root words.  These were 5-8 graders.

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pirateteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Associate Educator

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I tend to use google for everything lately.  I use it for my students' homework, calendars, surveys, newsletters, etc.  It seems to me that the wonderful google docs that I use for all of these things, must have something that can help you out.  Google, or any online program, would be great because students can access it from anywhere (and in many cases their phones and ipods).  So may of my kids lose everything as soon as they walk out the door, but the internet gives them a new, fun way to learn that can’t be lost in their book bags.

 

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wshoe | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Associate Educator

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Try quizlet.com.  You can set up your word lists and students can use a flashcard feature or play interactive learning games.  My students enjoyed doing the games on the Smart Board.  I especially like the audio feature because so many of my students struggled with pronunciation - and they won't learn the words if they can't say them. 

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pacorz | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

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Flash card machine is a free site that will let you make your own flashcard sets and manage them; you can also share your sets with other users.

Doing them three at a time is an excellent idea; anybody can handle just three new things at a time! Putting the three words of the day up where they can be seen at odd moments will help reinforce them. For instance, you can write them on a window with a Sharpie marker (nail polish remover will take it right off), or put them on sticky notes and just stick them in odd places around the room. Maybe you could make it into a "spot the word" contest for your students.

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marbar57 | Elementary School Teacher | (Level 3) Associate Educator

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I personally like the idea of fashcards.  Computer software is wonderful, but my computer isn't always turned on and I lose incentive while waiting for it to boot up.  I teach piano, and flashcards are invaluable for filling in the little moments and diversifying the lesson. 

As pertaining to your word list: Write each word on a flashcard and place all of them in a gallon zippered storage bag.  Then, you decide what words you are going to work on each day, place them in a sandwich bag and carry that around in your day planner, laptop case, purse, or briefcase.  Then, whenever you get five extra minutes (on the bus, train, subway, at lunch or break, etc.), go through them.  Keep adding new words to the mix each day, going over and over the older words for review.  I'm thinking it will take you about five weeks for mastery. 

Call me old-fashioned, but this method works! 

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readerofbooks | College Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

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There are many programs out there that can do this for you. For example, flashonary is an iphone application that does this for you. And if you type in flash cards in the application store, then many more will come up. Also the benefit of this is that you can download it on your computer. Many of these are free and completely programable with your own definitions.

Here is an example: http://pcflashcards.com/default.aspx?sid=2

A few more google searches, and you can pick the perfect one. One final suggestions. You can also use powerpoint, if it is for a classroom.

litteacher8's profile pic

litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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Why don't you put the words in a box. Students would probably really enjoy picking the words. Since these are Read 180 students, they likely need motivation. Another idea is to have students choose their own words from reading, which you then approve.
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wannam | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

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I used the site edHelper for things like this.  I think you can access the vocabulary sections for free, but I did have an account so I'm not sure if it is in the paid section.  You can create your own vocabulary lists including offering your own definitions.  The site will generate vocabulary crosswords, quizzes, tests, and other games.  This was a great help for my drama class.  This site has worksheets and worksheet generators, but it does not have the same wealth of material as eNotes.  For the purposes of generating vocabulary exercises and lists, it works.

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Lorraine Caplan | College Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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That is a great idea! Here are two links, one a blog with reviews of a few possibilities.  The best review is the one at the end, so be sure to keep scrolling.  The second link includes something that you can set up yourself. I don't know if it will set things up in groups of three for you, but it might be a start.  If you know anyone who does programming, and so many people do these days, you might be able get something tailor made.

 

http://srahuff.wordpress.com/tag/vocabulary/

http://www.eastoftheweb.com/short-stories/teacher.html#studyrooms

 

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ms-einstein | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Assistant Educator

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Consider making your own flashcards. Research shows retention rates improve when the learner takes notes or writes his or her own material. You already indicated you wanted to use your own definitions. If you are visual, you could even draw illustrations or your own mnemontic devices to help you remember the meaning. Decide if you want to make the flashcards all at once and over several sessions. Once they are created, use them in a specific way. Take your top three words. Practice them. If you get the meaning correct, move them to the back of the pile. If you get them wrong, put them somewhere in the middle of the pile. That way you will study words you don't remember more frequently. If you go through the pile at least seven times, research shows you will are morely likely to score an "A" than students who read notes or use flashcards less than seven times.

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tdb0304 | Student, Grade 9 | eNotes Newbie

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Why not both i mean sites are well organized and people can always use that site to find what they need to find. its easy and not complicated instead of going to other websites where you have to find the exact word your looking for. program is too a good thing, same as site ,

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bhawanipur | College Teacher | (Level 1) Valedictorian

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Its a nice session, full of enjoyment. But the students of our schools, situated in the most remote area, will not come the next day onwards. I find in India, specially in rural areas, students belong to the villages are scared of Engling. Since their chilhood they hear only that English is a very tough language. So they do not put much interest in it. I try to give them vocabulary words but they remain in the next class.

Yet I have made it a practice to give even to 10 to 20 students. If they lern it will be my achievements.

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teacher83 | Elementary School Teacher | (Level 1) eNoter

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In my classroom we have 10 minute vocabulary practice everyday.  Each student has a box (or rubber band of cards) with the 5-10 words they are working on.  On the front is the vocabulary word, on the back is a definition and the word in a high imagery sentence. 

We come up with fun games to play with each other: "Guess my Vocabulary Word" where students have to describe the word to each other without saying the word.  We even play Twister, where someone gives the defintion and the player puts their hand/leg on that word.  Actually, the kids make up the most fun games.

The words are 'graduated' once they can define and use it in a sentence other than the one that is on the back of their card.  At the end of each quarter, we revist the words that have been graduated to make sure they're still known.

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studystack | eNotes Newbie

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StudyStack.com is another flashcard site you might want to try.    For every set of flashcards created, there are eleven different activities you can use to study the information.    I think the more ways you review the information you are trying to memorize, the more successful you will be.

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