Is "[you] used to be called" an example of an idiom found in "Miss Rosie"?

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An idiom is an expression that does not mean what the literal meanings of the individual words denote.  That is, the meaning of the idiom cannot be inferred from the meaning of the individual words taken by themselves.

Using this definition, therefore, the line "who used to be the best looking gal...

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An idiom is an expression that does not mean what the literal meanings of the individual words denote.  That is, the meaning of the idiom cannot be inferred from the meaning of the individual words taken by themselves.

Using this definition, therefore, the line "who used to be the best looking gal in Georgia" does not seem to be an idiom.  It appears, rather, that is there is an idiom in Lucille Clifton's poem, "miss rosie," in the phrase "I stand up," which as an idiomatic expression that means to support someone.  Thus, in Clifton's poem, the speaker who says "I stand up" through your destruction" implies that she respects the old woman's experiences and endurance through the years.

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