Do you think the young man's appearance helped him to win the confidence of Gortsby in "Dusk"?  

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The fact that the young man who sits by Gortsby is well dressed certainly lends credibility to his story of being on what seems to be a business trip, and his unfamiliarity with London. It also piques Gortsby's interest in listening to this young man, but it is doubtful that...

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The fact that the young man who sits by Gortsby is well dressed certainly lends credibility to his story of being on what seems to be a business trip, and his unfamiliarity with London. It also piques Gortsby's interest in listening to this young man, but it is doubtful that this cynical and skeptical listener is impressed enough to afford the young man much credibility. 

Gortsby probably gives an ear to the young man's story because of his rationale for visiting the park at dusk:

The scene pleased Gortsby and harmonised with his present mood. Dusk, to his mind, was the hour of the defeated.

Gortsby is an observer of human nature, particularly the "defeated," among whom he counts himself as one, although his defeat is not the prevalent one of financial failure. Also, he seems to take a certain perverse delight in observing the misery of others, and he may derive some pleasure in feeling superior to them. Thus, he listens to the young man's tale until he detects a weakness in its credibility as the younger is not in possession of the soap that he has claimed to have purchased. After this discovery, Gortsby is disappointed in the young man and is able to demonstrate his acumen by making a quick, good judgement.  

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