Do you believe we have entered into a postmodern society? Is this the logical next step in societal evolution: hunter/gatherer, horticulturist/pastoralist, agrarian, industrialist,...

Do you believe we have entered into a postmodern society? Is this the logical next step in societal evolution: hunter/gatherer, horticulturist/pastoralist, agrarian, industrialist, post-industrialist (modernist), postmodernity? If so, where does the world go from here?

How Postmodernism Influences Our Thinking--YouTube URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6oceuuhhtvo

What is Postmodernism? The Postmodern Worldview--YouTube URL: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ynMS0g6zu5E

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jameadows | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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Whether you think the world has entered a postmodern phase is up to you. Many people, as expressed in the videos you include in the question, believe that the world can be defined as "postmodern." While this term is in itself vague, there is no doubt that in a global, fast-paced, cosmopolitan society like ours, there is no one definition of reality. Postmodernism allows for individuals to impose their own meaning on reality, which becomes increasingly more appealing and relevant in a world that offers so many different realities.

A postmodern world is also one in which culture and shared meaning are globally defined by the media and pop culture. There is no doubt that the media control a great deal of what we think and feel and that it's almost impossible to escape from pop culture. As shown in the video, more people recognize Paris Hilton, a pop culture star who stands for nothing, than know preacher Billy Graham. Perhaps this is the logical next step in our evolution, as the world is more global and more influenced by the media than ever before. At this point, people have different views about where the world goes from here. It could either continue to become global, postmodern, and media-influenced, or people could begin to withdraw into themselves and into small groups and re-establish the importance of traditions defined by their own church (or other religious institution), family, and region.