In The Yearling, how does Jody change through his ordeal of running away?

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Jody begins his running away with something of a plan. He wants to run off to Boston to see Oliver and Grandma Hutto. He is consumed by the pain of his loss and unwilling to confront going home and what it will mean. At first he even tells himself that...

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Jody begins his running away with something of a plan. He wants to run off to Boston to see Oliver and Grandma Hutto. He is consumed by the pain of his loss and unwilling to confront going home and what it will mean. At first he even tells himself that he is not hungry, that the smell of food doesn't hurt him much.

He works to come to terms with what has happened. He has to tell himself out loud that Flag is dead and that his father "went back on him."

He then begins to feel the real hurt of starvation. He begins to have cramps and feel the weakness and pain of real hunger. He also notices things that he still has things to learn from Penny, like starting a fire without a tinder horn. 

He then understands what his mother meant when she said that they would all go hungry if he didn't do something about Flag. He begins to understand her and her worry and her reasoning for shooting the fawn.

When he stops to build a flutter mill and then realizes it holds no joy for him anymore, he has accepted the responsibility of being a man. He is terribly sad for what he knows he has lost. This loss is confirmed once he gets home and speaks with his father. As he falls asleep, he cries out for Flag. But "It was not his own voice that called. It was a boy's voice. Somewhere beyond the sink-hole, past the magnolia, under the live oaks, a boy and a yearling ran side by side, and were gone forever."

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