Writing a fairytaleI am supposed to write my own original fairytale. I've got a beginning; there once lived a poor young boy who lived with his grandmother and baby sister in a old shack. One day...

Writing a fairytale

I am supposed to write my own original fairytale. I've got a beginning; there once lived a poor young boy who lived with his grandmother and baby sister in a old shack. One day he went out into the meadow and saw a beautiful, enchanted, angelic peacock. I need some more ideas for the rest of my story please and I want there to be a happy ending with the boy being rich and content. I also want the peacock to grant wishes and be a saviour. Thank you.

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bullgatortail's profile pic

bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Boy, does your fairy tale remind me of a real life story. The ending didn't turn out well for either the peacock or my friend. An old acquaintance worked at a park where peacocks roamed free. He had heard that eating peacock was an aphrodisiac in some countries, so he killed the beautiful bird and ate it. His life went downhill from there. He was fired from the park for killing the bird, drugs took over his life, and he eventually committed suicide--in his own bedroom, where his poor mother found his body. A terrible story, I know, and one not even to be considered as a Fractured Fairy Tale.

accessteacher's profile pic

accessteacher | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

You might want to consider whether you want a traditional happy ending or whether you wish to do something more devious and subversive. Unhappy endings can help make a much stronger moral argument than happy ones, in my opinion, partly because we all expect a happy ending in a fairy tale. You could have great fun with this. Good luck!

litteacher8's profile pic

litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

A fairy tale should have a moral. You have a good beginning. Now you have to consider what lesson the boy is going to learn. You'll need a conflict, a problem the boy needs to solve. When he solves it, he will learn the lesson.
stolperia's profile pic

stolperia | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

You've got some great ideas in the previous posts! Instead of adding more ideas, I would encourage you to consider the way in which you're going to tell your story. Take advantage of every opportunity to use descriptive language that will help the reader of your fairy tale to picture the scenes and situations in his/her mind. Action-packed adventures along the way as the little boy attempts whatever course of action you determine for him will make the story exciting to tell and enjoyable to read. Happy writing!

mwestwood's profile pic

mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

How ironic.  You know, there was a story on the news that a peacock had flown up to the 100+ floor; people were so concerned because he became afraid after having flown so high and seemed afraid to fly down, but once he became hungry/thirsty enough, he descended. 

Perhaps you can write a "fractured fairy-tale," that is, one that is humorous. The peacock could avoid the little boy and he must chase after it.  In so doing, the boy encounters various and sundry opportunities along the way.  Use your imagination!  Some of the things he encounters can be messy or worthless, for instance, yet someone brags on them. 

pohnpei397's profile pic

pohnpei397 | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

Typically, in a fairy tale like this, the boy would do or want to do something that would help him but which would harm the peacock.  So perhaps the boy will see the peacock and think that he could make a lot of money by killing the peacock and selling its feathers.  Or that he could sell it to be displayed in the garden of some rich man.  But then he would think again and not exploit the peacock at which point he would find out about its powers.  Then the moral of the story could be that you get rewarded for not being selfish.

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