How do you write a three-day lesson plan that demonstrates differentiated instructional strategies? I need to include the following: Demographics of your classroom An explanation of how your...

How do you write a three-day lesson plan that demonstrates differentiated instructional strategies?

I need to include the following:

Demographics of your classroom

An explanation of how your classroom is a safe place to learn

An explanation of how your lesson appeals to learners' varied intelligences and learning styles

An explanation of what and how pre-asessment will be used to determine readiness

An explanation of how alternative assessment plans will be used

An explanation of how meta-cognitive time will be built into the learning process

An Explanation of how your lesson offers opportunities for projects, creativity, problems, and challenges

Examples of curriculum approaches for your differentiated classroom

An explanation of student groupings

An explanation of how team members will be used to enhance this lesson

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litteacher8 | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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Differentiated instructional strategies mean that you are addressing every learner’s need in your classroom. 

You might have heard to this referred to as differentiated instruction.  Basically, it means that you include adaptations in your lesson for the needs of average learners, special needs students, advanced learners, and other learners.  A lesson plan is a document in which you describe what you will teach and how you will teach it.  Let’s give an example of a math lesson for kindergarten on counting. 

I will address each of the areas you mentioned in my answer.

Demographics of your classroom- You mentioned that you need to include the demographics of the classroom in your lesson plan.  Most classrooms will be heterogeneous, meaning they will have a wide variety of students in one classroom.  You will probably have students of all genders and ethnicities as well as students who are ESL speakers.

An explanation of how your classroom is a safe place to learn- I suggest explaining that you set clear behavioral expectations and that your classroom is a no bully zone.  You might also mention that you are always alert to student behavior and the language students use around each other to ensure that bullying is not going on in your classroom.

An explanation of how your lesson appeals to learners' varied intelligences and learning styles-  Please see my link on the different types of intelligences.  The theory means that people learn best when their intelligence style is met.  For example, those who are verbal learn better by having things explained or by reading, and those who are interpersonal learn better in groups.  Learning styles are auditory (learning by hearing), kinesthetic (learning by touching or moving), and visual (learning by seeing). Basically, you need to make sure that you have some type of visual aid or reminder for the students who understand visually, and say something for those who learn by hearing, and do something or get up and act things out for those who learn kinesthetically. For example, you could have manipulatives such as counters for the kids to count with (kinesthetic), or have them get into groups and count each other (interpersonal). You could have them count out loud (auditory), or point to the numbers (visual).

An explanation of what and how pre-assessment will be used to determine readiness-  You can give students a pre-assessment in the form of a worksheet with simple counting.

An explanation of how alternative assessment plans will be used-  An alternative assessment would be to have them count out loud with you one on one.

An explanation of how meta-cognitive time will be built into the learning process- Meta-cognition is thinking about thinking.  This means giving students time to think about their thinking. You can stop students at the end of each lesson and ask them what they have learned.

An explanation of how your lesson offers opportunities for projects, creativity, problems, and challenges- You can have a store where students buy things with play money, where they will need to count. The challenges involved will be that not all students will know English, and some students will not know their numbers, while other students will already know how to count.

Examples of curriculum approaches for your differentiated classroom-  Students who do not know English can teach children how to count in their language. Students who already know how to count can learn to count to higher numbers, or learnt to add. Students who do not know their numbers can learn their numbers while learning to count them.

An explanation of student groupings- Students will be grouped based on what they know on the pre-assessment for individualized and student-centered instruction and enrichment.

An explanation of how team members will be used to enhance this lesson- Co-teachers and the special education teacher or special education and English language learner/SDAIE aides can be used to assist during small group and assessment time to ensure that instruction is differentiated and all students get a chance to learn something.

Hopefully this helps you get an idea how to develop your own differentiated lesson plan!

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