Write a summary of "A Letter to God."

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Lencho and his family are waiting for the rain that will nourish their crops. They require the money from the harvest to support themselves and feed the family. When the clouds gather, though, it's not rain that comes down—it's hail. It destroys all the crops until there's nothing left.

Lencho...

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Lencho and his family are waiting for the rain that will nourish their crops. They require the money from the harvest to support themselves and feed the family. When the clouds gather, though, it's not rain that comes down—it's hail. It destroys all the crops until there's nothing left.

Lencho decides to write a letter to God and ask for help. He asks for 100 pesos to buy new seeds and plant a new set of crops. Then he puts it in the mailbox and hopes that God will answer it.

The postmaster looks at the address on the letter but knows that he can't send it. However, he admires the man's faith and wants to help him. He raises money from his employees, others, and himself and comes up with 60 pesos. Then he puts the money in an envelope and signs it God.

When Lencho gets the letter with the money, he writes an angry reply. The postmaster reads it and sees that Lencho has asked God to send the rest of the money—but not via the post office. He believes the postal employees stole 40 pesos of the money that God sent him.

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A Mexican peasant, Lencho, is distraught because a hailstorm has totally destroyed his crops and his family will have no food or money through the winter to come. He is a simple man of great faith in God and writes a letter asking for the modest sum of one hundred pesos. He mails the letter addressed to "Dios", and the village postmaster opens it and reads it. Moved by the ridiculousness of such a request but also by the peasant's simple but strong faith, the postmaster collects sixty-five pesos and mails it back to Lencho, being careful to cancel the stamp. Proud of the good deed and curious to see Lencho's reaction to the money from "God", the postmaster and his staff watch for the peasant's reaction to the gift. Surprise turns from triumph to disbelief to disappointment to outrage as Lencho counts the money. Lencho writes another letter to God, mails it, and leaves. The postmaster opens it and reads the following : Dios, thank you for the money, but please do not send it through the post office. They are thieves!"

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