How would a narrator's voice/point of view be changed if one is writing a monologue from the point of view of Boo Radley?This is to be written as a monologue and I am doing it for the first...

How would a narrator's voice/point of view be changed if one is writing a monologue from the point of view of Boo Radley?

This is to be written as a monologue and I am doing it for the first time.PLEASE CLARIFY.quote p 284

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lhc's profile pic

lhc | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Educator

Posted on

"To Kill a Mockingbird" is written in first person point of view, with Scout Finch as the narrator; therefore, as readers we are privy to the world through her eyes, observations, thoughts and feelings.  If one was to write a monologue, as you mentioned, from the point of view of Boo Radley, you would switch to first person point of view using Boo Radley's perspective; if, for example, you were writing one of the final scenes, with Scout walking Boo home, then you could change the quote, "I slipped my hand into his arm," to "She slipped her hand into my arm," as you say.  Changing point of view/perspective in this novel is an interesting thought, since so much of the "truth" of this novel comes from Scout's youthful naivete maturing into something a bit older, a bit more sophisticated, and having learned a very hard lesson about the nature of justice in her community. 

swimergirl77561's profile pic

swimergirl77561 | Student, Grade 10 | (Level 1) eNoter

Posted on

Yes, if it is a monologue and this is the narrator speaking then yes you are supposed to be the narrator.  This would be using passive voice which you never use, but you always use active voice. This means that instead of saying the subject received the action you are saying that the subject is performing the action.

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