I need help with a diary entry showing the point of view of Scout facing or witnessing a type of discrimination from To Kill a Mockingbird.I need help with choosing an event that Scout faced or...

I need help with a diary entry showing the point of view of Scout facing or witnessing a type of discrimination from To Kill a Mockingbird.

I need help with choosing an event that Scout faced or witnessed a type of discrimination and how it has is changed/affected her life? I also will need to be able to include three quotes.

Asked on by jessw128

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mwestwood | College Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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While there are several incidents of bias in Harper Lee's narrative, such as the remarks of Mrs. Dubose or of Mrs. Merriweather at the Missionary Tea or the trial of Tom Robinson, one incident that seems to really take Scout by surprise is her encounter with the bias of Miss Lula at the First Purchase African M.E. Church in the Quarters outside of Maycomb.

Before this Sunday spent in the society of Calpurnia, Scout has probably never encountered racial discrimination from a black person. In addition, Scout is also probably shocked when Calpurnia, who has instructed her in manners so often, calls out to Lula, "Stop right there, n--r," especially after Atticus has taught Scout to never use this word.  So intimidated by this situation is Jem that he asks Calpurnia, "Let's go home, Calpurnia, they don't want us here" as the congregation moves closer. Then, Zeebo, the garbage collector says, "Mister Jem,,,we're mighty glad to have you all here."

Certainly, the children must be emotionally moved by this welcome just as they have been intimidated by Miss Lula's hostility.  These turns of events at the First Purchase Church, then, can easily be occurrences upon which Scout reflects in her diary.  Her suddenly perceiving herself on the other side of racial bias and her nervousness in a setting unknown to her surely has had quite an affect upon Scout, one about which she could easily reflect in her diary. After this experience with Calpurnia, Scout has probably gleaned a most objective point of view regarding the race relationships of Maycomb.

In the Critical Overview of To Kill a Mockingbird, Enotes reveals,

Lee juxtaposes the innocence and curiosity of the children with the ignorance and hostility of many of the adults, using the character of Atticus Finch—the children's father and a respected attorney who defends Tom Robinson—as a standard of reason, compassion, and fairness.

The incident at Calpurnia's church certainly teacher Scout and Jem of the duality of prejudice.

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