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A Midsummer Night's Dream

by William Shakespeare
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Write a summary of act 5 of A Midsummer Night's Dream.

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There is only one scene in act 5 of Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream, and it serves as the conclusion to the play. The conflicts have been resolved between the characters.

We see the three now happy couples together in the Duke's palace: Theseus and Hippolyta, Lysander and Hermia,...

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There is only one scene in act 5 of Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream, and it serves as the conclusion to the play. The conflicts have been resolved between the characters.

We see the three now happy couples together in the Duke's palace: Theseus and Hippolyta, Lysander and Hermia, Demetrius and Helena. The young lovers are guests of the Duke and have recounted the dreamlike events that transpired in the woods. While Theseus dismisses the tale, Hippolyta wonders how all four could have had the same "dream."

Our lovers now meet the mechanicals as the mechanicals put on the play they have been rehearsing: "Pyramus and Thisbe." The play presented by our comedic troupe is full of double entendre and silliness. Quince introduces the play, Flute plays Thisbe, Snout plays the wall that separates the lovers, Starveling portrays the moonshine, Snug finally comes on as the lion, and of course we have Bottom as Pyramus. The play within a play concludes with a dance (as did many Shakespeare plays, and productions at The Globe Theatre continue to do so).

Puck and the rest of the fairies enter to show that they also have a happy ending. Puck addresses the audience, pontificating on the "dream" that we just witnessed (or read).

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