Write a short note on the role of chance and coincidence in the novel Silas Marner.

Chance plays an important role in Silas Marner. Drawing lots points falsely to Silas having stolen the church money, leaving him embittered and driving him to move to Raveloe. At Raveloe, chance brings little Eppie, an agent of redemption, into his life.

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Chance plays a significant role in Silas Marner . Crucially, it is chance that changes Silas's life. In order to determine who was guilty of stealing the bag of church money, the church's congregants draw lots. Silas, though circumstances make him appear guilty, is certain that drawing lots will show...

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Chance plays a significant role in Silas Marner. Crucially, it is chance that changes Silas's life. In order to determine who was guilty of stealing the bag of church money, the church's congregants draw lots. Silas, though circumstances make him appear guilty, is certain that drawing lots will show his innocence. He bows in prayer,

relying on his own innocence being certified by immediate divine interference, but feeling that there was sorrow and mourning behind for him even then—that his trust in man had been cruelly bruised. The lots declared that Silas Marner was guilty.

This occurrence drives Silas into bitterness and despair, and also into leaving Lantern Yard for Raveloe.

At Raveloe, chance again changes Silas's life, this time for the better. On New Year's Eve, Molly comes to Raveloe and by coincidence happens to die outside of Silas's cottage with little Eppie in her arms. By chance, the toddler looks up and wants to catch the light she sees shining and dancing out from Silas's open door. She heads for the door and enters, attracted by the warm fire on the hearth, which she falls asleep in front of.

Silas completely misses her entrance, but when he does see her, he thinks at first that this "heap of gold" is his "restored treasure." She is, in fact, a metaphoric treasure that will bring redemption and joy back into his life, but not in the way he thinks.

It is coincidence that causes Molly to die by Silas's cottage, bringing new life to him through her little daughter. This kind of coincidence, often framed as providential, is typical of the Victorian novel.

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