Write a letter to Guy Montag in which you describe both his respectable and disturbing qualities.

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In writing this letter to Guy Montag, consider, in terms of respect, that Montag does actively choose to confront the horrors of his job as one who burns books. Montag could have continued to repress any doubting thoughts or emotions about his role in society until he fully accepted his...

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In writing this letter to Guy Montag, consider, in terms of respect, that Montag does actively choose to confront the horrors of his job as one who burns books. Montag could have continued to repress any doubting thoughts or emotions about his role in society until he fully accepted his position without hesitation. And while Montag certainly did burn books and torture animals for the first eight years of his job, he nonetheless eventually confronts his horrific reality and his role in perpetuating oppression. Indeed, Montag's dramatic character change by the end of the novel is worthy of the letter writer's respect. One may consider including an acknowledgment in the letter of Montag's bravery in confronting his own actions and willingness to change.

Conversely, one could also address Montag's former enjoyment of his job as reason to find his character disturbing. In writing a letter to him, one might be compelled to ask just how he could have ever participated in burning people's beloved books and torturing animals. Additionally, while Montag was understandably acting out of a desire to be free, burning someone alive is certainly a disturbing act. Perhaps, in writing a letter to Montag, one could consider how his final act of liberation is both worthy of respect as well as disturbing.

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