Write a book review and summary for "Searching for Paradise in a World of Theme Parks" in Breaking the Fine Rain of Death by Emilie Towns.

"Searching for Paradise in a World of Theme Parks" in Breaking the Fine Rain of Death argues that only through empathy and love can society come together to rectify the difficulties faced by women of color, particularly their subpar standard of healthcare. The author argues that the eschatological concept of “paradise” does not have to be something otherwordly, but can be achieved here and now by appealing to a new kind of ethic which prioritizes empathy.

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Included in a book that explores the racially unjust and difficult circumstances of African American women’s access to sound healthcare, “Searching for Paradise in a World of Theme Parks” provides an eschatological basis for the hope of a better future. The chapter argues that there is a sort of “womanist...

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Included in a book that explores the racially unjust and difficult circumstances of African American women’s access to sound healthcare, “Searching for Paradise in a World of Theme Parks” provides an eschatological basis for the hope of a better future. The chapter argues that there is a sort of “womanist ethic” in the call for more fair and equitable healthcare for the African American population, which is based on the expectation of a coming “paradise.” The search for paradise

is a soul-deep and wishful conviction that our current circumstances are not ultimately definitive and inevitable.

Therefore, Emilie Towns contends that the hopefulness of black women for “salvation” is both pragmatically tied to access to better healthcare and not something to be considered otherworldly. Rather, it can be brought about by the transformation of practices and rituals of current-day society, which have ossified discriminatory practices against women of color.

"Searching for Paradise" emphasizes the need for society as a whole to more fully embrace the principles of empathy and love. Far from serving merely as a blind push toward complete and mindless social unity and heterogeneity, empathy implies deepening our respect for one another, embracing difference, and recognizing our overarching commonality with one another. The author maintains that such a disposition will lead to true love—not intellectual love, but a love which emanates from within. The disparities faced by women of color in healthcare and the damage that this disparity inflicts on their bodies will be seen (by everyone) as a damage inflicted on every body and thus as something worthy of collective concern and action.

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