What are the motives that drive humanity to commit acts of violence? one paragragh on one of this short stories "To build a fire" by London; "Lamb to the slaughter" by Dahl; "The lottery" by...

What are the motives that drive humanity to commit acts of violence? one paragragh on one of this short stories "To build a fire" by London; "Lamb to the slaughter" by Dahl; "The lottery" by Jackson; "The Cask of Amontillado" by poe; "The Tell-Tale Heart" by Poe; "A Good Man Is Hard to Find" by O'Connor. another paragraph on "The Odyssey"; "Animal Farm"; Romeo and Juliet". And the last paragraph on "To Kill A mockingbird". 

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sciftw | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

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The main motivation of Montressor in Poe's "The Cask of Amontillado" is revenge.  The reader is never told exactly how Fortunado upset Montressor, but the reader is told that Fortunado had insulted Montressor at a previous engagement.  Because of that insult, Montressor decides to get revenge.  He gets Fortunado drunk and lures him into the catacombs.  Once down there, Montressor chains Fortunado to a wall and bricks up the wall, effectively burying Fortunado alive. He does all of that to get revenge on Fortunado. 

In William Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet" revenge is another motivator for human violence.  Take Tybalt, for example. Romeo shows up uninvited to the Capulet party. Tybalt wants to fight him right then and there, but Capulet stops him. Tybalt vows revenge for the intrusion. 

"I will withdraw: but this intrusion shall
Now seeming sweet convert to bitter gall."

Later, Tybalt tries to exact his revenge on Romeo, but Romeo will not fight back. Mercutio does so instead. Tybalt kills Mercutio, and Romeo kills Tybalt in order to get revenge. Later in the play, Paris thinks that Juliet killed herself out of grief over Tybalt's death. Paris tries to avenge her death by challenging Romeo at the tomb. 

"Stop thy unhallow'd toil, vile Montague!
Can vengeance be pursued further than death?
Condemned villain, I do apprehend thee:
Obey, and go with me; for thou must die." (Paris, Act 5, scene 3)

The last book, "To Kill a Mockingbird" has violence in it that is also revenge centered.  During the trial, Atticus Finch exposed Bob Ewell as an abusive, racist drunk. Through his questioning, Atticus was able to show that Tom was innocent and being framed by Bob Ewell.  Bob got away with a trial win, but had a severely wounded pride.  Bob's first attempt at revenge was when he found Atticus, spit in his face, and tried to fight Atticus. Atticus simply walked away; however, Bob later attacked Jem and Scout in the street in an attempt to get revenge against Atticus.  It didn't work out so well, because Boo Radley saved the kids and killed Bob Ewell.  

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