Would you support amending the U.S. Constitution so that this difference becomes incorporated into the Russian Constitution? Would you support amending the U.S. Constitution so that this difference becomes incorporated into the Russian Constitution?

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I do not know if you are asking us to talk about amending the US constitution to account for something in our relationship with Russia, or if you are asking us to add Russia to the constitution! The other interaction we would have with Russia would be through tariffs, so we might amend the constitution to incorporate those.
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If the intent of an amendment to the U.S. Constitution--which has been amended numerous times all to good effect and may need to be amended again--was unification with the Russian Constitution through their adoption of our language and through a blending of ideological view points, this is an amendment that would be insupportable as our national documents can't be modified in respect of other nation's needs.

If, on the other hand, after an amendment was conceived and ratified to resolve a U.S. issue and Russia saw its value and efficacy in relation to a similar issue in their own land, then their adoption of such an amendment might very well mark a happy day in world affairs.

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Well, this is one of those questions where we have to guess the intent.  Understand that amending the US Constitution and the Russian Federation's are different processes in different countries and bear little resemblance or relation to one another.  Let's say, for example, that both the US and Russia added an amendment banning nuclear weapons in their countries.  That could be a very positive development for the world, though tricky to implement.

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I'm with #3... the question specifically asks about, to paraphrase, an amendment to the U.S. Constitution that incorporates "this difference" into the Russian Constitution. Without knowing what "this difference" is, we cannot give any sort of response to the question!

Additionally, I don't think there is any way that an amendment to the U.S. Constitution could affect anything in Russia. Their government structure is radically different from ours, and we don't have any sort of overlap in our policy-making procedures. We don't amend their Constitution, and they don't amend ours... so unless there is some sort of push to merge the U.S. with Russia that I don't know about, the question is really not detailed enough to answer.

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I'm not sure that I understand the question, or what the relationship is between amending the US Constitution, which has happened 27 times, and the Russian Constitution.

I am equally uncertain as to how the Constitution could be seen as "straightforward." It is deliberately vague in lanugage throughout, and as for its origins, I'd say it was more the result of hard-nosed compromise and political haggling than divine inspiration.

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The Constitution  is all-inclusive, meaning that everything is there for those who are noble, honest, virtuous, and upright.  It doesn't need much interpretation as its tone is dignified, straight-forward, and easy to understand.  It sets forth the basic instructions for running a country smoothly; at the same time, it leaves a little leeway and "give" to allow for the differences in personality of those who are governing.

The only amendments to the Constitution that I heartily endorse is The Bill of Rights, which came along a few years later.  They seem reasonable and proper and have helped us through the years.  But, I see no reason to change our constitution so another country can adopt it!  If Russia, or anybody else, wants to adopt our constitution as it is, or make changes on their end, that's their right.  But, we don't need to do it on our end to accomodate them!

 

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