Would you rather be born rich and ugly or beautiful and poor?

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I'd rather be born beautiful and poor.  If you are beautiful, there is a good chance you'll find someone rich to take care of you or otherwise use your beauty to make money.  Then you'll be beautiful AND rich.  Once you're ugly, you'll always be ugly.

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That's a hard question. My first thought is rich and ugly because the capitalist in me sees all that could be done with money. Of course, I was not born rich and have never been rich. Many of the ideals and values I have are based on the life I have lived. If I was born rich, I might be less satisfied with my life than if I gained riches later. I think those who struggle in life learn lessons that those who do not have to struggle miss out on. I might be able to be rich, but would I really be content?
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Rich and ugly, no contest. Beauty is, in our culture, as much about attitude, grooming, and accoutrements as anything else, and money can buy those things. Money also buys power - I would rather have my own power than be dependent on a man for it.

Consider this: Bill Gates is probably one of the least physically attractive men in America. It doesn't seem to have slowed him down much.

"I've been rich and I've been poor. Rich is better." - Bea Kaufman

 

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Being a longtime teacher, it's a no brainer: Rich and ugly would suit me just fine, since the affordability of plastic surgery is an option. Money can't buy happiness, but it can create financial security for the family and provide the option for an Ivy League education for the children and grandchildren. 

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Definitely poor and beautiful, especially in America.  Playing off the same stereotypes, I think women have an advantage in almost every professional field if they are physically attractive.  And maybe because of the fairy tale that is ingrained in every child (but especially young girls), there exists the notion that poor but beautiful girls can be resucued by handsome, rich men.  I realize the feminist movement would probably kill for me for embracing such a notion, but I don't think it is necessarily that far from reality for many people.

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Money can buy a lot in this world, and I really don't care much about beautiful or ugly because it is so in the eye of the beholder. Being poor financially can be a real interesting thing. I have travelled to some of the poorest pockets of the world, and poor does not equate to unhappiness, in fact, many have found what the rich don't ever find, contentment.

This is a difficult question to pose to middle class people. We all strive for rich and beautiful and toil our years away striving for both. A better question might be to ask at what level of beauty or financial success will you find happiness. The capitalist in us is never satisfied.

I choose poor.

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Rich and ugly.  Particularly since I'm a man.  Women (stereotype, I know) seem to be less hung up on looks than men.  So I could probably still find someone who would love me.  Then I could be rich and have love.  What more could you want?

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Rich and ugly, assuming that I could stay rich and also assuming that if I were born handsome and poor I would remain poor.  Handsome and beautiful people will eventually become much, much less handsome and beautiful, but if one is born rich and can stay rich, one has a great advantage in life (and can also pay for plastic surgery).  :-)

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