What three events represent the fall of the Old South and emergence of the New South, i.e. struggle for dominance, in "A Rose for Emily"?I would like help to explain three events that would...

What three events represent the fall of the Old South and emergence of the New South, i.e. struggle for dominance, in "A Rose for Emily"?

I would like help to explain three events that would represent Emily Grierson's fall. Thank you, AR.

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bullgatortail | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Distinguished Educator

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DEATH OF THE GRIERSONS.  Certainly, the death of, first, Emily's father and, later, her own death spelled the end of another chapter of Jefferson's history. Emily's father was an aristocrat of the town, and when she died, it became the end of the once prominent line. Their deaths serve as a symbol of the slow death of the Old South.
THE TAXES.  When a delegation tried to collect taxes from Miss Emily, she explained that her family's debt had been remitted into "perpetuity." It was Colonel Sartoris' way of honoring a man who had been an important part of the town. The delegation, representing the "new generation, with its more modern ideas," symbolizes the New South; their blatant disregard of the old agreement shows both a lack of respect for the past ways and Southern womanhood. The unchivalrous act of trying to collect a debt from a penniless spinster so soon after the death of her father shows a completely new shift in thinking.
ARISTOCRATIC DECADENCE.  The New South did not look fondly upon many ways of the past. The old Southern aristocracy were above many rules of the common man, and indiscretions and eccentricities of the ruling class were routinely overlooked. Miss Emily's flirtation with Homer Barron and her appearance with him, unescorted, on Sundays would have not been questioned a half century before. But, Christian morals and a more conservative view condemned her actions. Her inability to give up her father's corpse would have been considered merely odd behavior in ante-bellum days; but it was a shocking act of mental instability to the younger generation of Jefferson.

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