Would either of these make a good thesis for The Kite Runner?I was told to write a thesis for a summer reading project on the Kite Runner. The thesis also has to be made into a visual. My thesis...

Would either of these make a good thesis for The Kite Runner?

I was told to write a thesis for a summer reading project on the Kite Runner. The thesis also has to be made into a visual.

My thesis choices:

1. Amir pays back his loyalty to Hassan when Amir goes on the journey to rescue Hassan's son.

2. Hassan's loyalty brought guilt to Amir but twenty years later Amir is released of his guilt.

I am sort of liking the second one better.

Asked on by bookluvr3

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clairewait's profile pic

clairewait | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

On reading both your options - my advice is to choose one - then take the characters/plot out completely.  Typically - any essay or project thesis needs to be a statement of truth, based on the plot of the novel - not a statement of plot.  Try to tweak this statement to sound more like a theme statement - then back it up (or illustrate it) with events from the plot.

In this way - you can use both the examples you have written as support - and broaden the perspective of the thesis.  I see you have basically two subjects to play with here: loyalty and guilt.  You need to ask this question: "Based on events in the novel The Kite Runner, what is the author trying to say about loyalty and guilt?"  Answer that question specifically - but without any plot details.  Then support it with plot details.  Looking at what you have so far - I might say something like, "Loyalty is often strengthened by guilt."  -or- "Forgotten loyalty is often remembered and remedied through guilt."

As a teacher, this is more what I would be looking for.  Hope that helps.

scarletpimpernel's profile pic

scarletpimpernel | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

Do you have to use the thesis statement for an essay, or is it solely for a visual?  The answer to that question might help us better help you.

I do agree with you that the second statement is better than the first.  I would consider tweaking the second one so that you can support it visually or textually.  For example, is it really Hassan's loyalty that causes Amir's guilt or are Amir's selfish choices regarding Hassan the real source of his guilt.  If you reworded the first part to place emphasis on Amir's actions engendering his guilt, you could easily support it with evidence from the book.  Similarly, the second part of your sentence implies that Amir is completely guilt-free at the end of the novel, but the author just leaves his readers with a glimmer of hope (like Sohrab's half smile) regarding Sohrab's recovery and Amir's redemption.  By making some changes, you will have a statement that is logical and supportable. 

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