working womenwhat is the value of working women in your point of view?

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auntlori's profile pic

Lori Steinbach | High School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

Posted on

For single women, working is a necessity.  Without that option, this category of people would be dependent on others to meet their needs.  Make no mistake, the number of working single women is high--a benefit to society both in productivity and in self-sufficiency (not creating a burden for the working men of the world).  There are clearly some negatives to having women in the workforce as have already been mentioned; however, specifically, the value of single women in the workforce is clear.

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crmhaske | College Teacher | (Level 3) Associate Educator

Posted on

I agree with post #7 and others who have posted that women have the same working value as men.  I think a better question would be what is the human value of working?  It is much more introspective, I think, to ignore gender and gender roles, or the stereotypes we have of them, and just talk about the world's perceptions and uses of work, and what it means to us to be human in this regard.

Gender stereotyping starts really young, especially with boys rather than girls believe it or not.  I think that's where the problems start really.  Girls who wear baseball caps, and want to play on the football team are just seen as tomboys, and there is very little social stigma associated with a girl experimenting with what are typically seen as male gender roles.

With boys on the other hand there is a great deal of social stigma with them experimenting with girl gender roles.  A boy that likes to make the bed, wash the dishes, or play with dolls will be ridiculed at school.  Even when it comes to sexuality there is a great deal less of a social stigma that a woman lesbian or bisexual will face than there is for a male gay or bisexual.

It is my hope that as we progress forwards in time these archaic gender roles our children face in society will begin to diminish.  Adults can make conscious choices to be who they are regardless of the stigma and deal with it emotionally, most children can't.

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brettd | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

I agree with post #7 and others who have posted that women have the same working value as men.  I think a better question would be what is the human value of working?  It is much more introspective, I think, to ignore gender and gender roles, or the stereotypes we have of them, and just talk about the world's perceptions and uses of work, and what it means to us to be human in this regard.

crmhaske's profile pic

crmhaske | College Teacher | (Level 3) Associate Educator

Posted on

I think the value of women working is no different than the value of men working.  I also think the value of men choosing to be stay-at-home dads is equal to the value of women choosing to be stay-at-home moms.

Research done into the effect on children in homes where both parents work shows that they are just as well adjusted as children who are from homes where mom or dad stay home.  The research has also shown that children with mothers who enjoy their jobs are quite well adjusted.

Aside from the biological limitations (men can't breastfeed for instance), men and women in relationships share equally responsiblity for all of the same things.  Studies into children reared by homosexual parents have shown that they are just as well adjusted as children with heterosexual parents so the question of children needing their mother at home is moot.

Responsibilities should be shared, not gender stereotyped.

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MaudlinStreet | High School Teacher | (Level 2) Senior Educator

Posted on

I agree with posters #2 & #5. I've been working since I was a junior in high school, and that included when I was going to school full-time. I think that it has allowed women to redefine their roles in the culture at large as well. Women don't have to marry or rely on a man for financial independence. Women can also choose to pursue a career or travel, and to either wait to have children or decide to not have children at all, without feeling like they're a traitor to their sex.

My mom worked all my life, and raised me as a single parent. I never felt deprived or neglected; on the contrary, I was proud of my mother for everything she did. This was after raising 5 children (3 her own, 2 my dad's), so I suppose she lived the "traditional" life first. She absolutely loves children and loves raising them. I, on the other hand, have no plans to have children, and am very happy working as a teacher and going to school. I think it's important to keep the idea of choice in mind. Women now have the same opportunities to choose their own path of existence, just as men have had for centuries. We can choose to work, if that's what suits us best (personally, it works for me). Or, we can choose to marry, have children, and (if one is lucky enough to be in a financially secure situation) stay at home to raise them, if that's what suits us best. It's all about the right to choose our own lives, or as poster #5 said "finding identities inside and outside the home".

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clairewait | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

in my point of view the working women hasn't a value because whene they married  the responsability becomes difficult

certainly we have seen a decline in the traditional family structure as a result of the women's movement into the workplace - but I personally think that some new positive dynamics in families have resulted as well.  For one example, the rate of women in college is currently higher than men.  This is a big deal considering where we came from historically.  I like that women are finding identities inside and outside of the home.  I for one, would not be entirely happy nor satisfied if "wife" and "mother" were the only two jobs I knew.

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besure77 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Senior Educator

Posted on

I believe that working women are just as valuable as working men. Women contribute equally. On a personal level, I believe that when women work they gain a sense of independence. Some people believe that the proper place for a women is in the home but this notion has changed dramatically over the years.

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scarletpimpernel | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

I've worked full time since before I graduated college, and for me personally, it has helped me be independent, has given me a sense of accomplishment, and frankly, I just really enjoy my job (teaching). From a practical standpoint, I didn't get married until I was 34; so my working made it possible for me to buy a house and not have to feel that I needed to get married in order to have security.

From a child's perspective, my mom worked full-time as a nurse during the years that my siblings and I were growing up.  Because of my mom's job, we helped out a lot around the house--I learned to cook at a young age so that I could have a meal ready when my mom got home.  I enjoyed doing that and didn't feel like I had to, but I would not have had the opportunity to practice so much if my mom had been home cooking all the time.  Similarly, I got to spend a lot more time with my dad because he arranged his work schedule to be home with us while my mom was at work.

There are disadvantages, of course, to women working, but from my personal experience, it's been more positive than negative.

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nabila25 | Middle School Teacher | (Level 1) Honors

Posted on

in my point of view the working women hasn't a value because whene they married  the responsability becomes difficult

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