With regard to Wordsworth's "Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey," can you help me to apply at least two quotes which illustrate his use of 2 of the 5 I's of Romanticism (Imagination,...

With regard to Wordsworth's "Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey," can you help me to apply at least two quotes which illustrate his use of 2 of the 5 I's of Romanticism (Imagination, Inspiration, Intuition, Idealism, and Individuality)?  

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Ashley Kannan | Middle School Teacher | (Level 3) Distinguished Educator

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In "Lines Composed a Few Miles Above Tintern Abbey," all five I's of Romanticism are displayed.  I will focus on Inspiration and Idealism.

The natural setting of Tintern Abbey inspires Wordsworth.  It triggers his ability to think and reflect on the arc of his life.  In the poem's opening lines, what Wordsworth sees around him inspires him to embrace deep thought: 

Once again 
Do I behold these steep and lofty cliffs, 
That on a wild secluded scene impress
Thoughts of more deep seclusion;

Wordsworth is inspired to enter into a "deep seclusion" because of the "steep and lofty cliffs" he beholds.  Nature has inspired Wordsworth.  It is why he opens the poem with it; it is a muse that has enabled his creative powers to take flight. 

Such a belief is idealistic.  As seen in lines 47- 49, Wordsworth wants to achieve the ideal of being one with the world around him:

While with an eye made quiet by the power
Of harmony, and the deep power of joy,
We see into the life of things.

Wordsworth seeks an ideal that transcends what is around him.  When he speaks of how there is a "deep power" which enables him to "see into the life of things," Wordsworth is talking about a universal condition of truth.  He articulates an idealist position that causes him to understand more about himself, the world, and his place in it.

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