Wordsworth compared to ArnoldWordsworth is emotion and intutive within his writing. I believe one of his abilities was to capture human nature or nature in general within his works, for example...

Wordsworth compared to Arnold

Wordsworth is emotion and intutive within his writing. I believe one of his abilities was to capture human nature or nature in general within his works, for example "Preface". If I were to compare him to another romantic writer, I would say Matthew Arnold. His poem Dover Beach, speaks of nature or human nature as well. I'm curious if anyone agrees or feels different. Of course evidence from each poem help to better one's opinion.

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marbar57 | Elementary School Teacher | (Level 3) Associate Educator

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All authors who are considered "romantics" will be concerned with nature, imagination, emotions instead of reason, the individual rather than society as a whole, and perhaps the supernatural.  Think Edgar Allen Poe and Washington Irving; Samuel Taylor Coleridge and Keats.  So, Arnold and Wordworth are no different.  I have read both of these authors, but admit openly that I prefer Wordsworth because he is so much more readily accessible to all people.  That is not to say that he is simple, but his topics and word selections are for every day people, thus making it less daunting for students than Matthew Arnold.

  This is so true!  I've actually read some of Wordsworth's poetry with my 4th graders.  Some of the words and poem's meaning were hard for them to understand at first, but after taking the poem apart and discussing it, then re-reading it again, they actually enjoyed it!  I will definately use his poetry again for future teaching!

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marbar57 | Elementary School Teacher | (Level 3) Associate Educator

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I like Wordsworth's poetry!  It's so fluent, flowing, and magical!  If you close your eyes you're transported to somewhere else for just a moment.  Take the poem, Tinturn Abbey for example.  He had visited the Abbey when he was twenty-three and was inspired by its beauty.  Five years later, accompanied by his sister, he visited it again after it had been destroyed.  He was so struck by the comparison between the two visits that a poem began to form in his head, which he later wrote down and included in his collection of poems called Lyrical Ballads.  Here are a few excerpts from an article about the poem.  *See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tintern_Abbey_(poem)*

Although written in 1798, the poem is in large part a recollection of Wordsworth's visit of 1793. It also harks back in the imagination to a time when the abbey was not in ruins, and dwells occasionally on the present and the future as well. The speaker admits to having reminisced about the place many times in the past five years. Notably, the abbey itself is nowhere described . . . Wordsworth styles himself as a "worshipper of Nature" with a "far deeper zeal / Of holier love", seeming to hold that mental images of nature can engender a mystical intuition of the divine.

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amy-lepore | High School Teacher | (Level 1) Educator Emeritus

Posted on

All authors who are considered "romantics" will be concerned with nature, imagination, emotions instead of reason, the individual rather than society as a whole, and perhaps the supernatural.  Think Edgar Allen Poe and Washington Irving; Samuel Taylor Coleridge and Keats.  So, Arnold and Wordworth are no different.  I have read both of these authors, but admit openly that I prefer Wordsworth because he is so much more readily accessible to all people.  That is not to say that he is simple, but his topics and word selections are for every day people, thus making it less daunting for students than Matthew Arnold.

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